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Talking about feelings

Written by · Published Jun 5, 2018

To reserve any of the following books for parents/carers and children dealing emotions to your local library, click on the links to reserve them from our online catalogue, visit any of our libraries, or contact us on 01473 351249 or help@suffolklibraries.co.uk

You can sign up for a library card online for free. You can sign your child up for a library card at any age.

The Great Big Book of Feelings, by Mary Hoffman & Ros Asquith

“This title opens with the question, ‘How are you feeling today?’, and leads on to a spread by spread presentation of a wide range of feelings.

“Lots of different children in lots of different situations, brief text captions, and plenty of humour make sure the book is fun, as well as dealing with a serious and important subject - human feelings.”

My Mixed Emotions: learn to love your feelings, by Elinor Greenwood

“Feelings can be complicated, and learning to express them is a skill that must be developed. My Mixed Emotions is here to coach children through a variety of emotions and situations including dealing with bullying, understanding grief, and coping with large family changes, such as divorce.”

A Book of Feelings: starring Sam, Kate and Fuzzy Bean, by Amanda McCardie & Salvatore Rubbino

“This story stars a brother and sister, Sam and Kate, and their dog, Fuzzy Bean. Sam and Kate know what makes them happy: cuddling Mum, reading a story with Dad, swimming, running and dancing, lots of things. But they don’t feel happy all the time (nor does Fuzzy Bean), and in the course of the book we see them feeling grumpy, embarrassed, shy, nervous, frightened, sad and jealous.

“Both words and pictures portray the children in many different situations at home and at school, and show how they change over time, how emotions can escalate, and how people can help each other.”

Sweep, by Louise Greig & Júlia Sardà

“Ed’s bad mood begins as something really small, hardly a thing at all. But before long it grows, gathers pace, and spreads through the whole town. Can Ed sweep his troubles away?”

Words and Your Heart, by Kate Jane Neal

“Told through the eyes of Pip and Cat, this book demonstrates the importance of what we say - both positive and negative.

“Thoughtful, warm-hearted and completely non-preachy, this is a book that has already resonated with large numbers of children, whose teachers report a sea-change in the culture of their classroom after reading it.”

When Sadness Comes to Call, by Eva Eland

“When Sadness arrives, try not to be afraid: give it a name, listen to it and spend some time together. Maybe all it wants is to know that it’s welcome.

“This beautiful debut by new author-illustrator talent Eva Eland takes a poignant but uplifting look at dealing with uncomfortable emotions.”

Michael Rosen’s Sad Book, by Michael Rosen & Quentin Blake

“We all have ‘sad stuff’ to deal with in life. What makes Michael Rosen most sad is thinking about his son, Eddie, who died. In this book he writes about his sadness, how it affects him, and some of the things he does to try to cope with it.”

The Colour of Happy, by Laura Baker & Angela Rozelaar

“Blue is for the calm I feel wandering in the spring. Yellow is for happy when I spot a special thing.”

“A beautiful exploration of feelings shown through colour as one little boy navigates a range of emotions - from happiness and excitement to hope and love, all on his way to present a gift to his mum. This book is the perfect introduction to both emotions and colours.”

Tough Guys (have feelings too), by Keith Negley

“Did you know wrestlers have feelings? And knights. Even superheroes and ninjas feel sad sometimes. In fact everyone has feelings - especially dads who love their children!

“Children will love recognizing their feelings in Keith Negley’s bold illustrations which accompany a fun-to-read-aloud narrative. Parents can joyfully engage with children in a light-hearted discussion about emotions and how they affect us all!”

The Big Angry Roar, by Jonathan Lambert

“Cub is angry, so he stomps and smashes and roars! But now he just feels worse! Maybe his friends can help?

“The perfect story for any child experiencing feelings of anger and learning what to do with them.”

Fergal is Fuming!, by Robert Starling

“A dragon with a short temper is not a good combination, as Fergal’s family and friends soon find out. He burns the dinner (literally), reduces the football goal to ashes and absolutely cannot play a nice, quiet board game.

“It is only when he starts to notice other animals have clever tricks to calm down that Fergal begins to win back his friends, especially when he discovers dragons can cool off in a very handy way.”

Teeth Are Not for Biting, by Elizabeth Verdick

“Sooner or later, almost all young children will bite someone - a friend, a parent, a sibling. This upbeat, colourful, virtually indestructible book helps prevent biting and teaches positive alternatives.”

No More Biting for Billy Goat!, by Bernadette Ford & Sam Williams

“It’s Billy Goat’s first day at school, and he feels lost and lonely. Even though he really wants to join in the fun and games, he just doesn’t know how. Billy Goat gets so frustrated that he even bites Piggy, Lambkin, and Bunny! But with a little gentle guidance from sympathetic Ducky, he learns that teeth are for biting food - not your friends.”

I Like Bees, I Don’t Like Honey!, by Sam Bishop & Fiona Lumbers

“A beautifully illustrated, funny and thought-provoking book for building confidence and encouraging children to express their feelings - about anything and everything. This book will help enable a much broader conversation about individuality, fear and hopes.”

Everyone…, by Christopher Silas Neal

“A first book of mindfulness and feelings, award-winning illustrator Christopher Silas Neal invites young readers to explore how we feel what we feel, and how everyone else feels it, too. From the animals in the woods to the neighbours in their homes nearby, everyone cries, everyone laughs, everyone sings - everyone.

“With vivid art in a stylish limited palette, this is a wonderfully accessible exploration of the universality of feelings, perfect for sharing - and encouraging discussion - with the very youngest of children.”

On Sudden Hill, by Linda Sarah & Benji Davies

“Birt and Etho are best friends, they play on Sudden Hill, making marvellous contraptions out of cardboard boxes. But then a new boy, Shu, wants to join in too. Birt isn’t sure that he wants Shu to join them.

“Eaten up with jealousy, he goes home and refuses to come out to play. Until Etho and Shu come to his house with the most marvellous cardboard contraption so far.”

The Colour Monster, by Anna Llenas

“This is the story of a sweet little monster who wants help from his friend to understand the feelings he experiences.”

Spike: the hedgebog who lost his prickles, by Jeanne Willis & Jarvis

“Spike, a little hedgehog, has always had impressive prickles. But one morning, after a particularly scary dream, he wakes up completely bare! Oh no!

“Feeling very embarrassed, he goes in search of something to cover himself, from a paper lampshade to a tea cup to a very stinky sock. But nothing stops the other animals giggling at him. Poor Spike!

“Then he discovers a big bunch of balloons, which takes him across the world and ends in a very satisfying POP! and a very prickly party.”

Feelings, by Libby Walden & Richard Jones

“Explore a world of emotions with this peep-through picture book. Richard Jones’ enchanting illustrations and the lyrical text make each and every feeling come to life to help children understand the emotions they experience.”

Mr Panda’s Feelings, by Steve Antony

“Lemur is happy! Swan is scared. But how is Mr Panda feeling?

“Find out and help your little bears express their emotions with Mr Panda in this board book.”

How Are You Feeling Today?, by Molly Potter & Sarah Jennings

“We all experience emotions and emotions are absolutely fine as long as we know what to do with them. Feelings arrive effortlessly enough but deciding what to do with them when they turn isn’t so easy - especially when you are a child.

“Cue: this book! It provides children with several straightforward, entertaining and appropriate interactive ideas to help them deal with a selection of significant emotions. This is a great dip-in book where children can choose a feeling that relates to them and then turn to the page that provides child-friendly strategies for dealing with that feeling.”

Wilbur’s Book of Feelings, by Valerie Thomas & Korky Paul

“Wilbur the cat is cuddly, friendly, and ready to introduce babies and toddlers everywhere to early-learning concepts with a dash of his very own feline mischief.”

Good Days, Bad Days, by Catherine & Laurence Anholt

“This jaunty, rhyming book of opposites presents large, simple words and detailed illustrations to convey the richness of everyday family life with its ups and downs. It captures all the moments and feelings which make up a small child’s day.”

Kay Barnham’s Everyday Feelings series, illustrated by Mike Gordon

Lisa Regan books

Isabel Thomas’s Dealing with Feeling series, illustrated by Clare Elsom

Brian Moses’ dinosaur series, illustrated by Mike Gordon

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.