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New children’s books for October 2015

Written by · Published Oct 1, 2015

The wolf wilder by Katherine Rundell

Board books

Boo! A book of spooky surprises by Jonathan Litton

Boo! A book of spooky surprises by Jonathan Litton

A jolly rhyming board book with sturdy chunky pages and cut outs that will be great for little fingers this October.

Picture books

Grrrrr! by Rob Biddulph

Grrrrr! by Rob Biddulph

It’s funny, would be great for noisy story times and encourages friendship. What more could you want? We want the paperback edition to be available right now, so we can buy loads more copies.

The lion inside by Rachel Bright & Jim Field

The lion inside by Rachel Bright & Jim Field

A tiny little mouse asks the lion how to roar in this retake on an Aesop fable. It’s a gem of a book, beautifully illustrated and with a trip-along rhyme that’s just begging to be read aloud.

What the ladybird heard next by Julia Donaldson

What the ladybird heard next by Julia Donaldson

Hefty Hugh and Lanky Len are back to their old ways, but the animals trick them again in this super new rhyming masterpiece from Donaldson & Monks. With humour, glittery bits and a ladybird to finger trace as well.

The brilliant surprise by Daniel Postgate

The brilliant surprise by Daniel Postgate

The surprise is that it’s The Clangers, all ready for nostalgic fans of 1960s children’s TV (and new fans of steam punk?).

Shark in the park on a windy day! by Nick Sharratt

Shark in the park on a windy day! by Nick Sharratt

A new near-miss adventure for Timothy Pope and his telescope, just in time for autumn. Perfect for story times and pretty good to read at home too, this is Nick Sharratt’s third Shark title. If you haven’t seen them before, try Shark in the park or Shark in the dark. You’re in for a treat.

Beginner reads

Brave Bruno by Laurence Anholt & Tony Ross

Brave Bruno by Laurence Anholt & Tony Ross

Bruno is the latest relative to be introduced in the My Freaky Family series, currently being re-issued by Orchard Books after a break of many years. Excellent for young collectors (if you are a collector, Brave Bruno has a coach load of alliterative relatives, Mucky Micky, Rude Ruby, Tiny Tina to name but 4), for Tony Ross addicts, and for children whose own families can’t bear them to read another book about a certain horrid boy who shall remain nameless.

Bob’s bobble hat by Margaret Nash

Bob’s bobble hat by Margaret Nash

Just in time for autumn comes this nice little book for children just starting to read by themselves. The illustrations are ‘staged’ photographic and rather appealing, whereas the hat is a matter of opinion. In Bob’s opinion, it’s horrible.

Short chapter books

Star on a stormy mountain by Jill Lewis

Star on a stormy mountain by Jill Lewis

The second title in Gill Lewis’ Puppy Academy series is this delightful tear jerker for puppy lovers, (and lovers of little lambs too.) Sarah Horne’s illustrations hit just the right note of pathos and humour, and I love the bones at the foot of each page!

Junior novels

Curse of the evil custard by Alan MacDonald and Nigel Baines

Curse of the evil custard by Alan MacDonald and Nigel Baines

Second in the Superhero School series, this would be perfect for Dirty Bertie fans, or as a ‘what else?’ for Jeremy Strong addicts.

Pugs of the frozen north by Philip Reeve

Pugs of the frozen north by Philip Reeve

“And they’re off! Who will win the Race to the Top of the World? Helga Hammerfest and her polar bears; bounder and cheat Sir Basil-Dumpling; Shackleton Jones with his robot-powered sled ?But wait! What’s this? Two kids riding a sled pulled by 66 pugs wearing jumpers?! The underdogs are coming!”

The wolf wilder by Katherine Rundell

The wolf wilder by Katherine Rundell

“Feo lives in the snowbound woods of Russia, in a house full of food and fireplaces. Ten minutes away, in a ruined chapel, lives a pack of wolves. Her mother is a wolf wilder, and Feo is a wolf wilder in training. A wolf wilder is the opposite of an animal tamer: it is a person who teaches tamed animals to fend for themselves, and to fight and to run, and to be wary of humans.” Set during the Russian Revolution, this is a challenging read for Years 6 to 8.

Picture books for older readers

Where the bugaboo lives by Sean Taylor and Neal Layton

Where the bugaboo lives by Sean Taylor and Neal Layton

You can read and re-read this exciting ‘choose your own adventure’ picture book without getting bored because there are so many options to choose from. Neal Layton’s illustrations are as varied as the adventures of the brother and sister who race through the action-packed pages.

Young teen

Silence is goldfish by Annabel Pitcher

Silence is goldfish by Annabel Pitcher

“Tessie-T has never really felt she fitted in and after what she read that night on her father’s blog she knows for certain that she never will. How she deals with her discovery makes an entirely riveting, heart-breaking story told through Tess’s eyes as she tries to find her place in the world.”

Demon road by Derek Landy

Demon road by Derek Landy

Landy fans will be celebrating the start of this series, featuring the feisty new 16 year old heroine Amber, on an “epic road trip across the supernatural landscape of America.”

Trollhunters by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus

Trollhunters by Guillermo del Toro and Daniel Kraus

“In San Bernardino, California, children are going missing. The townspeople don’t believe the rumours of trolls, but 15-year-old Jim Jr knows that they’re a very real threat. At night, is anyone safe?” Superb line drawings by Sean Murray, punctuate this terrifying adventure. It’s not for the feint hearted. As Jim says, “You are food”.

Junior non-fiction

An A-Z of beasts by Adam Blade

An A-Z of beasts by Adam Blade

Need to know the age, power, magic level, fright factor and size of each beast in Adam Blade’s menagerie? Look no further, for you’ll find it here in this beautifully designed hardback encyclopaedia. A Top Trumps for Beast Quest fans. I shall add it to my ‘list of books to buy for Christmas presents’. We’ve bought a similar A-Z of Flower Fairies, but it’s not a magic patch on this.

The Usborne official knight’s handbook by Sam Taplin

The Usborne official knight's handbook by Sam Taplin

If you’re one of the people who like Master Scatterbrain the knight’s son, or are interested in castles and such like, you’ll probably want to borrow this book too. It’s full of useful and informative details about the life and daily routines of the average knight, printed in an easy to read format, with funny illustrations on every page. I think we may need to buy more copies!

Young adult

Concentr8 by William Sutcliffe

Concentr8 by William Sutcliffe

“In a future London, Concentr8 is a prescription drug intended to help kids with ADD. Keep the undesirable elements in line. Keep people like us safe from people like them. What’s good for society is good for everyone. Troy, Femi, Lee, Karen, and Blaze have been taking Concentr8 as long as they can remember. They’re not exactly a gang, but Blaze is their leader, and Troy has always been his quiet, watchful sidekick – the only one Blaze really trusts. They’re not looking for trouble, but one hot summer day, when riots break out across the city, they find it.”

The rest of us just live here by Patrick Ness

The rest of us just live here by Patrick Ness

There is a line of humour running throughout this new title by Patrick Ness. Juxtaposed against and almost despite the backdrop of “normal” teens with their normal angsts are a series of supernatural manifestations; you know, “zombies, soul-eating ghosts” and whatever. I couldn’t help imagining the characters played by younger versions of David Mitchell, Hugh Dennis et al. In fact I think a film of this book is already overdue!

Jo Dixon

I work for Suffolk Libraries Stock Team.