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New children’s books for June 2015

Written by · Published Jun 1, 2015

Betty goes bananas in her pyjamas by Steve Antony

Picture books

Betty goes bananas in her pyjamas by Steve Antony

Betty goes bananas in her pyjamas by Steve Antony

This is my absolute favourite book of the month. I love Steve Antony’s work; it always makes me smile. As for Betty, she is a phenomenon in her own right; a toddler (gorilla) with a stubborn streak. Correction- it’s not a streak, the whole of her being is stubborn. She emanates stubbornness; she is stubbornness. If you’ve ever tried to get an unwilling toddler to bed, you’ll feel for the poor old toucan.

Ten little dinosaurs by Mike Brownlow and Simon Rickerty

Ten little dinosaurs by Mike Brownlow and Simon Rickerty

This is my absolute favourite book of the month too. The rhyming text is gloriously funny and the illustrations are a perfect match. Who could have predicted that Brownlow and Rickerty could come up with a rival to Ten Little Pirates or Ten Little Princesses? They have surpassed themselves with this one and created another witty classic. The dinosaurs have character, charm, charisma and buckets of child appeal as we follow them through their first day on earth, from egg to bedtime.

Who woke the animals? by Charles Fuge and David Conway

Who woke the animals? by Charles Fuge and David Conway

If you have fond memories of Charles Fuge’s Bedtime hullaballoo, you’ll be as pleased as we were to find it has been republished here (though why under this new title is beyond me). If you have no such memories and the book is new to you, then you’re in for a treat. It’s a wonderful bedtime read – filled with humour, repetition and a richness of language. The illustrations are packed with expression; just masterful. And the answer? A tiny shrew.

Where, oh where is Rosie’s chick? by Pat Hutchins

Where, oh where is Rosie’s chick? by Pat Hutchins

Way back when (1968 actually), Pat Hutchins produced her timeless classic Rosie’s Walk. Here, after all these long years, is a sequel in that same distinctive style. With a colour palette limited to yellow, green and orange, the illustrations resemble woodcuts in their simplicity. The original story was simple too, and the original Rosie remained calm as she walked through the farmyard blissfully unaware of the fox who followed her and the calamities which befell him. This Rosie is in a bit of a flap – as well she might be, for the fox has had children since we last met.

Junior novels

The Nowhere Emporium by Ross MacKenzie

The Nowhere Emporium by Ross MacKenzie

“The shop from nowhere can appear at any time, in any city. It’s labyrinth of rooms contain wonders beyond belief. When the mysterious Nowhere Emporium arrives in Glasgow, orphan Daniel gets drawn into its magical world. Then the owner, Mr Silver, disappears, and Daniel’s world begins to crumble.” It is an original and well written mystery for 8 to 12 year olds, from a Scottish writer.

Joe all alone by Joanna Nadin

Joe all alone by Joanna Nadin

A heart-warming/heart-breaking story about Joe, an autistic boy left alone in his tower block flat whilst his mum holidays in Spain. It incorporates major life themes such as bullying, friendship and racism into a truly remarkable book. A marvellous, inspiring and funny read. Great for avid readers of 9 and above. Perhaps this is my favourite book of the month!

Younger teen

If you were me by Sam Hepburn

If you were me by Sam Hepburn

A real nail-biter of a novel about a refugee family resettled in London following death threats from the Taliban. With an English boy and an Afghan girl as protagonists, this exciting crime story is full of suspense and danger. It includes scenes of violence which can be quite frightening, but these are offset by the courage displayed by the central characters.

Older teen

Simon vs the Homo sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Simon vs the Homo sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

“16-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight”. The quote on the cover, from Teen Vogue magazine calls this book “The love child of John Green and Rainbow Rowell”.

All I know now by Carrie Hope Fletcher

All I know now by Carrie Hope Fletcher

The “wonderings and reflections on growing up gracefully” of a ex-teen blogger, who has successfully survived into her twenties, on the way becoming an actress. Her friendly chatty style makes the book as easy to read as her vlog.

Junior non-fiction

Could an octopus climb a skyscraper? by Camilla De la Bédoyère & Aleksei Bitskoff

Could an octopus climb a skyscraper? by Camilla De la Bédoyère & Aleksei Bitskoff

Packed full of interesting facts, presented in an accessible and understandable way. It’s as attractive as a picture book. Don’t miss their Could a penguin ride a bike? and Could a whale ride to the moon?.

Gardening for beginners by Abigail Wheatley

Gardening for beginners by Abigail Wheatley

This is a sturdy well-illustrated guide to gardening for 7 – 10 year olds. It offers practical advice about a range of gardening topics such as growing vegetables, how to make compost, bee friendly flowers and more. It’s a good introduction to using an information book; there is a contents list, a glossary and an index.

Jo Dixon

I work for Suffolk Libraries Stock Team.