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New children’s books for February 2016

Written by · Published Feb 1, 2016

Wolfie the bunny by Ame Dyckman & Zachariah O'Hora

Board books

Where’s Teddy? by Rod Campbell

Where’s Teddy? by Rod Campbell

Buster loses his teddy time after time in this nice chunky board book designed to encourage close attention to the illustrations.

Mine! by Emily Gravett

Mine! by Emily Gravett

Another book about Bear and Hare is always welcome. In this one, greedy hare gets more than he bargained for. Poor old hare, he just can’t help himself!

Picture books

Pirates in pyjamas by Caroline Crowe

Pirates in pyjamas by Caroline Crowe

A rolling rhyming romp of a book, with very bright illustrations, this would be great to read at story times, and not bad for bedtime either.

Land shark by Beth Ferry and Ben Mantle

Land shark by Beth Ferry and Ben Mantle

Does your child long for a pet? Bobby wanted a shark for his birthday but gradually grows to love the puppy he was given instead. (It was the trail of destruction and the huge bite that convinced him.)

Odd Socks by Michelle Robinson

Odd Socks by Michelle Robinson

This rhyming love story between a pair of socks is an imaginative delight of a picture book. Cheerfully illustrated and with a perfect ending, it’s a lovely lively romp to make story times go with a zing.

Farm Picture Puzzle book by Kirsteen Robson

Farm Picture Puzzle book by Kirsteen Robson

14 pages packed with puzzles to pore over, this book is brilliant! You just can’t rush at it – well not the first time anyway.

Wolfie the bunny by Ame Dyckman and Zachariah O’Hora

Wolfie the bunny by Ame Dyckman & Zachariah O'Hora

Gorgeously produced on lovely thick paper with illustrations dabbed with humour (it’s published by Andersen Press who know a thing or two about making gorgeous books) this picture book is a must. It’s about a young rabbit, mighty suspicious of the baby (wolf) whose arrival is greeted by the rest of the family with coos and smiles and photos. Wonderful , wonderful, wonderful.

Junior novels

Anyone but Ivy Pocket by Caleb Krisp

Anyone but Ivy Pocket by Caleb Krisp

Ivy Pocket is a 12-year-old maid who agrees to carry a valuable diamond from Paris to London, and so becomes embroiled in a conspiracy. Wonderfully illustrated by John Kelly, this book fairly romps along with humour and adventures galore.

The many worlds of Albie Bright by Christopher Edge

The many worlds of Albie Brightman by Christopher Edge

“When Albie’s mum dies, it’s natural he should wonder where she’s gone. His parents are both scientists and they usually have all the answers. Dad mutters something about Albie’s mum being alive and with them in a parallel universe. So Albie finds a box, his mum’s computer and a rotting banana, and sends himself through time and space to find her.”

The river horse by Abie Longstaff & Lauren Beard

The river horse by Abie Longstaff & Lauren Beard

This is the second title in the popular new Magic Potions Shop series. It’s filled with loveable characters, has a plot that’s easy to follow, and gives lots of extra information too about the potions, as well as a word search and a quiz to extend the reading pleasure.

Thunderbot’s day of doom by Alan MacDonald

Thunderbot’s day of doom by Alan MacDonald

Third in the Superhero School series, it bears the classic Alan MacDonald hallmark of silliness, we came to love in Dirty Bertie. In this episode, a weather forecaster is transformed into a malevolent robot. “With gadgets a-plenty, our young superheroes must battle through ice, snow, tornadoes and lightning strikes – but can they save the day?”

Danger down the Nile by James Patterson

Danger down the Nile by James Patterson

An adventure mystery starring girls as well as boys, is always welcome, and this one is a thrill-a-minute. This second title of the Treasure Hunters series sees the children of the Kidd family on a hair raising quest to rescue their parents from kidnappers. It’s “edge of the chair” stuff, illustrated with tons of kerpow!

Jail break! by Jeremy Strong

Jail break! by Jeremy Strong

This is the second title of Jeremy Strong’s new series “Romans on the rampage” about the young boy Perilus and his family. It’s full of interesting facts about daily life in Rome, and actual Latin words whilst being a hoot to read. Like “Carry on up the Colisseum”, but for children.

The midnight panda by Holly Webb

The midnight panda by Holly Webb

“James doesn’t like night-time. When the lights go out, strange shadows appear in his room, and who knows what’s hiding under the bed! But when one of the shadows turns into a big, friendly panda, James realizes that maybe the dark isn’t so bad after all.”

Junior non fiction

Flaming Olympics by Michael Coleman

Flaming Olympics by Michael Coleman

An updated edition all ready for Rio.

Help your kids with music by Carol Vorderman

Help your kids with music by Carol Vorderman

This is a well presented book just packed with facts about scales, pitch, melody, key signatures and much much more. It has useful sections about all the main instrument groups, and about musical styles and how to write music. There are links on several pages to an accompanying CD too.

Young teen

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead

A bittersweet story of the trials and friendships of growing up.

Never evers by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison

Never evers by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison

If you read their previous novel Lobsters a Rom Com set largely on a festival campsite, you’ll know to expect a good read. The main action in Never evers takes place at a French ski resort, and it’s so well written, you’ll laugh your way through it from the start in an English bathroom.

YA

Sophie someone by Hayley Long

Sophie someone by Hayley Long

“Sophie and her family came to live in Belgium when she was only four or five years old, but she’s fourteen now and has never been quite sure why they left England in the first place. Then, one day” she finds her grandmother on Facebook, and hopes she can unlock the mystery of who she really is, why they are there and why her mother never goes out. It’s a brilliant read, once you get your head round the code that the author uses throughout, substituting one word for another eg kindle for kitchen, dormouse for door etc.

Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D Schmidt

Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D Schmidt

This compelling novel about a boy who became a father aged 13, is being compared to a Steinbeck.

In the shadow of blackbirds by Cat Winters

In the shadow of blackbirds by Cat Winters

An atmospheric tale “set in 1918, when a deadly epidemic of influenza was raging across America & at the same time thousands of young men were being sent to fight in the Great War in Europe, this story follows Mary Shelley Black as she comes to terms with the loss of her first love. Mary thought she didn’t believe in ghosts, but her young man has come back and now she’s wondering what he wants from her?”

Jo Dixon

I work for Suffolk Libraries Stock Team.