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New Young Adult books for September 2018

Written by · Published Aug 30, 2018

The Hurting, Dogchild, And The Ocean Was Our Sky

Wildcard, by Marie Lu

Sequel to Warcross.

“Emika Chen barely made it out of the Warcross Championships alive. Now that she knows the truth behind Hideo’s new NeuroLink algorithm, she can no longer trust the one person she’s always looked up to, who she once thought was on her side.

“Determined to put a stop to Hideo’s grim plans, Emika and the Phoenix Riders band together, only to find a new threat lurking on the neon-lit streets of Tokyo. Someone’s put a bounty on Emika’s head, and her sole chance for survival lies with Zero and the Blackcoats, his ruthless crew.

“But Emika soon learns that Zero isn’t all that he seems - and his protection comes at a price. Caught in a web of betrayal, with the future of free will at risk, just how far will Emika go to take down the man she loves?”

And The Ocean Was Our Sky, by Patrick Ness & Rovina Cai

“In this novel, the world of Moby Dick is turned upside down, and we see the story through the eyes of the whale. Bathsheba’s tale is of the hunt for a legend and a myth, the hunt for a devil named Toby Wick, whose white hull lurks in the deep. She is bound by an ancient prophecy to find him. But is he really the devil that Bathsheba seeks?”

Publisher HarperCollins says: ‘Patrick Ness turns the familiar tale of Moby Dick upside down and tells a story all its own with epic triumph and devastating fate.’

Princess in Practice, by Connie Glynn

Sequel to Undercover Princess.

“As Lottie and Ellie return to Rosewood after the dramatic events of their first year, they’re hoping for a peaceful term. But strange things are happening at Rosewood. Pupils are being poisoned. Is the threat of secret organisation Leviathan growing closer? Lottie and Ellie are determined to find the culprit; but danger could be closer than they think.”

The Glass of Lead and Gold, by Cornelia Funke

From the author of Reckless and the Inkheart trilogy.

“A Christmas story set in the Mirrorworld reflection of the city of London - Londra - a fairy-tale-like story of magic and discovery by one young, orphaned girl.”

Dogchild, by Kevin Brooks

From the Carnegie-winning author of The Bunker Diary (not for the faint-hearted).

“Jeet was raised by a pack of wild dogs. Recaptured and ‘rehumanised’, Jeet now lives with the last of his people in an ancient walled town in the vast expanse of the Deathlands, besieged by a much larger enemy clan. They are preparing for the final battle and it’s Jeet’s task to record the events.

“But Jeet is struggling to come to terms with his half-human, half-dog identity. Can the impending conflict, and his relationship with another rehumanised dogchild, shed any light on what it takes to be a survivor?”

The Hurting, by Lucy Van Smit

Noir thriller set in Norway.

“Nell doesn’t believe in love until she falls for Lukas. But Lukas has his own dark agenda, and in this tale of hidden secrets and shocking twists, he manipulates Nell closer to the point of no return. How far is she willing to go for love?”

A Winter’s Promise, by Christelle Dabos & Hildegarde Serle (trans.)

Already a bestseller in France, this is the first in fantasy quartet ‘The Mirror Visitor’.

“Long ago, following a cataclysm called ‘The Tear,’ the world was shattered into many floating celestial islands. Known now as Arks, each has developed in distinct ways and at a different pace; each seems to possess its own unique relationship to time.

“Ophelia lives on Anima, an ark where objects have souls, with which Ophelia can communicate. When she is promised in marriage to Thorn, from the powerful Dragon clan, Ophelia must leave her family and follow her fiancee to the floating capital on the distant Ark of the Pole. Though she doesn’t know it yet, she has become a pawn in a deadly plot.”

The Monsters We Deserve, by Marcus Sedgwick

A fictional exploration of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein by the author of Saint Death and The Ghosts of Heaven.

“The Villa Diodati, on the shore of Lake Geneva, 1816: the Year without Summer. As Byron, Polidori, and Mr and Mrs Shelley shelter from the unexpected weather, old ghost stories are read and new ghost stories imagined. Born by the twin brains of the Shelleys is Frankenstein, one of the most influential tales of horror of all time.

“In a remote mountain house, high in the French Alps, an author broods on Shelley’s creation. Reality and perception merge, fuelled by poisoned thoughts. Humankind makes monsters; but who really creates who?”

Killer T, by Robert Muchamore

Dystopian thriller about genetic engineering from the author of the CHERUB series.

“Harry and Charlie are teenagers whose lives are shaped by a society that’s shifting around them. He is a lonely Brit in his first term at a Las Vegas high school. She is an unlikely friend, who gets accused of mixing a batch of explosives that blew up a football player.

“The two of them are drawn together at a time when gene editing technology is starting to explode. With a lab in the garage anyone can beat cancer, enhance their brain to pass exams, or tweak a few genes for that year-round tan and perfect beach body. But in the wrong hands, cheap gene editing is the most deadly weapon in history. Killer T is a synthetic virus with a ninety per-cent mortality rate, and the terrorists who created it want a billion dollars before they’ll release a vaccine.”

The Price Guide to the Occult, by Leslye Walton

“When Rona Blackburn landed on Anathema Island more than a century ago, her otherworldly skills might have benefited friendlier neighbours. Instead, guilt and fear led the island’s original eight settlers to burn ‘the witch’ out of her home. So Rona invoked the privileges of a witch; she cursed them.

“But such a spell always comes with a terrible price, and in punishing the island’s residents, Rona also bound her family ever tighter to them. Fast-forward to the present day and all Nor Blackburn wants is to live an unremarkable teenage life. And she has reason to hope that she may have escaped the thorny side-effects of the family matriach’s curse.

“But then a mysterious book comes out, promising to cast any spell for the right price. The author - Nor’s own mother - seems capable of performing magic that should be far beyond her capabilities. And such magic always requires a sacrifice. A storm is coming.”

American magazine Kirkus Reviews calls this ‘an atmospheric, blood-drenched dark fantasy for a cold and stormy night.’

Rosie Loves Jack, by Mel Darbon

“Rosie loves Jack. Jack loves Rosie. So when they’re split up, Rosie will do anything to find the boy who makes the sun shine in her head. Even run away from home. Even cross London and travel to Brighton alone, though the trains are cancelled and the snow is falling. Even though any girl might find that hard, let alone a girl with Down’s syndrome.”

It Ends With You, by S. K. Wright

“Everyone loves Eva. Beautiful, bright, fun, generous - she’s perfect. So when her dead body is found in a ditch in the local woods the only thing anyone wants to know is: Who could have done this? It has to be Luke, her boyfriend. He has the motive, the means, the opportunity and he’s no stranger to the police. Even though the picture is incomplete, the pieces fit. But as time passes, stories change.

“Told from six narrative strands, this cleverly woven and utterly compulsive novel challenges preconceptions; makes you second, third and fourth guess yourself; and holds an uncomfortable mirror up to the way societies and systems treat those they perceive to be on the outside.”

Publisher Little, Brown calls this ‘a chilling modern thriller for fans of E. Lockhart, One Of Us Is Lying and 13 Reasons Why.’

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.