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New Young Adult books for September 2017

Written by · Published Aug 30, 2017

Moonrise, I Am Traitor, A Skinful of Shadows

The Empty Grave, by Jonathan Stroud

Jonathan Stroud, author of the brilliant Bartimaeus Sequence series, returns with a new addition to his thrilling ghost-hunting Lockwood and Co. series.

“After their recent adventures, the Lockwood & Co team deserve a well-earned break, so naturally they decide to risk their lives breaking into a heavily-guarded crypt. A building full of unsettled souls, it’s also the final resting place of Marissa Fittes, the legendary and (supposedly) long dead ghost hunter. What they discover their will change everything.

“So begins a race to get to the truth behind ‘the Problem’, and an epic struggle against the Fittes agency. A struggle that will pit the team against the most terrifying enemy they have ever faced. Not even the dead will survive unscathed.”

A Skinful of Shadows, by Francis Hardinge

The new book from the author of Costa Award-winning novel The Lie Tree.

“The Felmotte family have a dark and terrible secret: inheriting the title of Lord Felmotte means not only taking on centuries of family history, political allegiance and land, but also the souls of seven previous patriarchs - jostling for space within the poor beleaguered body of the heir. When civil war takes the Felmotte men into battle for King Charles, attention turns to 15-year-old Kate, the illegitimate child of the current heir, in possession of the family ‘talent’.

“Working as a servant and kept around in case of just such an emergency, Kate knows what that attention might mean and, rather than become a vessel for the bickering souls of generations of angry, volatile men, arms herself the best way she can - by taking on the spirit of a very angry, very dead bear.”

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe, by Lauren James

“Can you fall in love with someone you’ve never met, never even spoken to - someone who is light years away?

“Romy Silvers is the only surviving crew member of a spaceship travelling to a new planet, on a mission to establish a second home for humanity. Alone in space, she is the loneliest girl in the universe until she hears about a new ship which has launched from Earth - with a single passenger on board. A boy called J.

“Their only communication is via email - and due to the distance between them, their messages take months to transmit. And yet Romy finds herself falling in love. But what does Romy really know about J? And what do the mysterious messages which have started arriving from Earth really mean? Sometimes, there’s something worse than being alone.”

I Am Traitor, by Sif Sigsmarsdottir

The English language debut from a bestselling Icelandic author.

“London has been targeted by extra-terrestrial life; large pipes fall from the sky, sucking teenagers up into a world that is entirely unimaginable. Amy Sullivan surrenders in a quest to save the teenage population. But nobody can prepare her for what’s on the other side of the pipes; a grim and gruelling dystopian world run a specialised government. In order to save the human race, she must literally fight the other species.”

We See Everything, by William Sutcliffe

According to publisher Bloomsbury, this is a “gripping and powerfully relevant thriller set in a closed-off, bombed-out London where constant surveillance is the norm.”

“Lex lives on The Strip – the overcrowded, closed-off, bombed-out shell of London. He’s used to the watchful enemy drones that buzz in the air above him. Alan’s talent as a gamer has landed him the job of his dreams. At a military base in a secret location, he is about to start work as a drone pilot.

“These two young men will never meet, but their lives are destined to collide. Because Alan has just been assigned a high-profile target. Alan knows him only as #K622. But Lex calls him Dad.’

Things a Bright Girl Can Do, by Sally Nicholls

“Through rallies and marches, in polite drawing rooms and freezing prison cells and the poverty-stricken slums of the East End, three courageous young women join the fight for the vote. Evelyn is seventeen, and though she is rich and clever, she may never be allowed to follow her older brother to university. Enraged that she is expected to marry her childhood sweetheart rather than be educated, she joins the Suffragettes, and vows to pay the ultimate price for women’s freedom. May is fifteen, and already sworn to the cause, though she and her fellow Suffragists refuse violence. When she meets Nell, a girl who’s grown up in hardship, she sees a kindred spirit. Together and in love, the two girls start to dream of a world where all kinds of women have their place.”

Moonrise, by Sarah Crossan

Eagerly-awaited new verse novel from the author of the Carnegie Award-winning One.

“Joe hasn’t seen his brother for ten years, and it’s for the most brutal of reasons. Ed is on death row. But now Ed’s execution date has been set, and Joe is determined to spend those last weeks with him, no matter what other people think.

“This poignant, stirring, huge-hearted novel asks big questions. What value do you place on life? What can you forgive? And just how do you say goodbye?”

They Both Die at the End, by Adam Silvera

An LGBT love story with a difference from a New York Times bestselling author.

“When Mateo receives the dreaded call from Death-Cast, informing him that today will be his last, he doesn’t know where to begin. Quiet and shy, Mateo is devastated at the thought of leaving behind his hospitalised father, and his best friend and her baby girl. But he knows that he has to make the most of this day, it’s his last chance to get out there and make an impression.

“Rufus is busy beating up his ex-girlfriend’s new boyfriend when he gets the call. Having lost his entire family, Rufus is no stranger to Death-Cast. Not that it makes it any easier. With bridges to mend, the police searching for him and the angry new boyfriend on his tail, it’s time to run. Isolated and scared, the boys reach out to each other, and what follows is a day of living life to the full. Though neither of them had expected that this would involve falling in love.”

No Shame, by Anne Cassidy

Powerful continuation of the story started in No Virgin.

“Stacey Woods has been raped and now she has to go through a different ordeal - the court trial. But nothing in life it seems is black and white and life is not always fair or just. Suddenly it seems that she may not be believed and that the man who attacked her may be found not guilty. If so, Stacey will need to find a way to rebuild her life again.”

The Red Ribbon, by L. J. Adlington

“As 14-year-old Ella begins her first day at work she steps into a world of silks, seams, scissors, pins, hems and trimmings. She is a dressmaker, but this is no ordinary sewing workshop. Hers are no ordinary clients. Ella has joined the seamstresses of Birkenau-Auschwitz, as readers may recognise it. Every dress she makes could mean the difference between life and death. And this place is all about survival.

“Ella seeks refuge from this reality, and from haunting memories, in her work and in the world of fashion and fabrics. She is faced with painful decisions about how far she is prepared to go to survive. Is her love of clothes and creativity nothing more than collaboration with her captors, or is it a means of staying alive?”

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.