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New Young Adult books for August 2017

Written by · Published Jul 31, 2017

The Warrior, The Disappearances, Freshers

The Rasputin Dagger, by Teresa Breslin

“Nina Ivanovna cares nothing for the troubles of her country. Russia in 1916 may be on the brink of revolutionary chaos, but with the death of her father, her world has just collapsed. Now she must travel to St Petersburg to escape her past, and find a future. Here she discovers a life, friends, and romance.

“But Nina is soon caught up in the domestic world of the Russian royal family, and as unrest on the streets threatens to reach breaking point, this is a very dangerous place to be. Though desperate to save those she cares about, and share her life with the boy she loves, Nina’s every move seems to be haunted by a beautiful, ruby-studded dagger. A dagger that will draw her ever closer to the mad, bad world of Grigori Rasputin.”

The Warrior, by Joseph Delaney

The third instalment in the Arena 13 trilogy, by the author of the creepily fantastic Spooks series:

“After everything Leif has been through in Arena 13, it’s finally time for him to fulfil his destiny and accompany his father’s people beyond the barrier that imprisons all mankind. Meanwhile, Kwin, the girl he loves, is making waves in the arena as the first woman ever to grace its fighting floor. In their own ways, each of them is fighting to bring down the superhuman monsters that threaten the last people on earth. They might have picked fights they can’t win. But freedom could be something worth dying for.”

The Disappearances, by Emily Bain Murphy

“When Aila and her brother are sent to stay with her deceased mother’s oldest friend they think they are going to find refuge. What they find instead is a town beset by a curse, and a population sure that their mother has something to do with it. Every seven years something goes missing in this town: the stars, reflections, the ability to dream, the sound of music - and it is the eve of another ‘disappearance’. As Aila struggles to find out what is happening, she finds that the truth is the answer to the town’s woes, and facing that is where the future lies.”

Another Place, by Matthew Crow

“Sixteen-year-old Claudette Flint is coming home from hospital after an escalating depression left her unable to cope. She may seem unchanged on the outside; but everything’s different. The same could be said about her seaside hometown. A local teenager, Sarah, has disappeared. Sarah had a bad reputation round town; but now she’s vanished the close-knit community seems to be unspooling.

“As the police investigate and the press digs around for dirt, small town scandals start to surface. What nobody knows yet is that Claudette and Sarah had a secret friendship. And that the last secret Sarah shared may be the key to the truth. After weeks of focusing solely on herself, Claudette realizes she is not the only part of the world that needs fixing - and that if she can piece together the fragments of Sarah’s story, then maybe she can piece herself back together too.”

Freshers, by Tom Ellen & Lucy Ivison

From the authors of Lobsters: a socially awkward love story, Freshers has been described as ‘laugh-out-loud funny and achingly real’.

“Uni beckons. Phoebe can’t wait, especially since her crush from school will be there. But Luke’s oblivious, still reeling from the fallout of the break-up with his ex. Thrown head first into a world of new friends, parties and social media disasters - can Phoebe and Luke survive the year, let alone find each other?”

The Start of Me and You, by Emery Lord

From the author of When We Collided, The Start of Me and You is on the Zoella and Friends Book Club list for 2017.

“Can you plan happiness? It’s been a year since Paige’s first boyfriend died in a swimming accident and it’s time she rejoined the real world. So she makes a plan: date a boy (long-standing crush Ryan Chase seems like the perfect choice); attend parties (with best friends by your side: doable); join a club (simple enough, right?); travel (might as well dream big); swim (terrifying. Impossible).

“But when she meets Ryan’s sweet but so nerdy cousin, Max, he opens up her world and Paige’s plans start to change. Is it too late for a second chance at life?”

Everybody Hurts, by Joanna Nadin & Anthony McGowan

“Matt and Sophia live in the same city, but they come from opposite sides of the track. By rights they should never have met. They definitely should never have fallen in love at first sight, of all clichés. But, to their great surprise, they do.

“That’s the easy part. It’s what to do next that they struggle with. Friends, family and circumstance are mostly against them. They betray themselves; then they betray each other. And in the end they learn, the hard way, what it takes for love to survive. It’s true what they say. Everybody hurts sometimes. But sometimes, too, the pain is worth it.”

All the Ways the World Can End, by Abby Sher

“Lenny is preparing for the apocalypse. Every night, she researches vacuum decay, designer pathogens, that inexplicable sleeping sickness knocking people out in Kazakhstan.

“Not many 16-year-olds are this consumed with the end of the world. But Lenny needs to have some sense of control. Her dad is dying of cancer. Her best friend Julian is graduating early and moving three states away. She’s having to rehearse for a toe-curling interpretive dance show at school, and deal with her mum’s indefatigable jolliness and smoothie-making in the face of the disaster they are confronting.

“The one thing keeping her hopeful is Dr Rad Ganesh - her father’s oncologist. Surely Lenny can win him round to her charms - and he can save her father?”

Jo Dixon

I work for Suffolk Libraries Stock Team.