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New non-fiction for March 2016

Written by · Published Mar 1, 2016

In search of Anne Brontë by Nick Holland

In search of Anne Brontë by Nick Holland

In search of Anne Brontë by Nick Holland

The brilliance of Anne Bronte’s work belies the quiet, truthful girl who often lived in the shadow of her more outgoing sisters. Yet her writing was the most revolutionary of all the Brontes, pushing the boundaries of what was acceptable. This revealing biography opens Anne’s most private life to a new audience. A year after Anne’s death her sister Charlotte prevented re-publication of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Anne was dismissed by a critic as “a Bronte without genius”. However, in recent years, with increasing critical interest in female authors, her life has been re-examined and her work re-evaluated, leading to her acceptance, not as a minor Brontë, but as a major literary figure in her own right.

It’s on the meter: travelling the world by London Taxi by Paul Archer and Johno Ellison

It's on the meter: travelling the world by London Taxi by Paul Archer and Johno Ellison

When Paul, Johno and Leigh bought an iconic London cab called Hannah, little did they know what they were letting themselves in for. Leaving London in their taxi, the lads began a 43,000-mile trip that would take them off the beaten track to some of the most dangerous and deadly places on the earth.

Broken vows: Tony Blair, the tragedy of power by Tom Bower

Broken vows: Tony Blair, the tragedy of power by Tom Bower

If you are a figure in the public eye the last thing you want is investigative reporter Tom Bower writing your biography. Bower follows his books on Robert Maxwell, Richard Branson and Bernie Ecclestone by tackling Tony Blair and his legacy. Expect plenty about Blair’s battle with Gordon Brown, his relations with the Palace, his private life and his controversial ventures since office.

Mediterranean cooking for diabetics: delicious dishes to control or avoid diabetes by Robin Ellis

Mediterranean cooking for diabetics: delicious dishes to control or avoid diabetes by Robin Ellis

Yes it is the same Robin Ellis who used to be Poldark on TV. This book is a second, fully revised edition of his Delicious Dishes for Diabetics. Based on Mediterranean cuisine – one of the healthiest in the world – Ellis shares his lifetime collection of healthy and simple recipes especially selected and adapted for people wishing to control or prevent Type 2 diabetes.

Marriages are made in Bond Street: true stories from a 1940s marriage bureau by Penrose Halson

Marriages are made in Bond Street: true stories from a 1940s marriage bureau by Penrose Halson

In the spring of 1939, with the Second World War looming, two determined 24-year-olds, Heather Jenner and Mary Oliver, decided to open a marriage bureau. They found a tiny office on London’s Bond Street and set about the delicate business of match-making. Drawing on the bureau’s extensive archives, Penrose Halson – who many years later found herself the proprietor of the bureau – tells their story, and those of their clients. It is true to say all human life is here.

The new vegetarian by Alice Hart

The new vegetarian by Alice Hart

Wholefood has come a long way. The vegetarian option is no longer a sad side-dish of limp vegetables. But these rapid changes in trends can be confusing. Is raw the same as vegan? Should we go ‘grain-free’ or experiment with ancient grains? What does plant-based really mean? Is sugar still the bad guy these days? Alice Hart is a food expert and an incredible cook. In this book she covers the full range of nourishing vegetarian food, with chapters on ‘Mornings’, ‘Raw and Healthy’, ‘Gatherings’, ‘Amazing Grains’, ‘Grazing’, ‘Dinners’, and ‘Afters’.

Quentin Blake: in the theatre of the imagination: an artist at work by Ghislaine Kenyon

Quentin Blake: in the theatre of the imagination: an artist at work by Ghislaine Kenyon

Quentin Blake is one of the foremost illustrators of the 20th century. Perhaps best known for his collaboration with Roald Dahl he is cherished by young and old alike, throughout the world. Yet his work has not attained ‘fine art’ status. Should it be considered so? How does Blake’s background in education inform his work? And what is the interrelation between the work he makes and the life that he leads? Curator Ghislaine Kenyon has spent a great deal of time with Blake during the last decade and a half and in this book she provides a profound insight into an extraordinary man and a truly remarkable body of work.

Brandon King

I work in the Suffolk Libraries Stock Team