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New non-fiction for April 2016

Written by · Published Mar 31, 2016

The foodie teen by Alessandra Peters

The foodie teen by Alessandra Peters

The foodie teen by Alessandra Peters

Nutritious, delicious meals from the award-winning teenage blogger Alessandra Peters. Peters is a blogger, photographer and health enthusiast who has been cooking her way through an autoimmune disease and numerous food intolerances. Using seasonal, locally-sourced produce, the book contains over 100 recipes which are naturally gluten-free, dairy-free and nutrient-rich.

Lemmy: the definitive biography by Mick Wall

Lemmy: the definitive biography by Mick Wall

Based on original interviews conducted between Lemmy and the author over many years, along with the insights of those who knew him best – former band mates, friends, managers, fellow artists and record business insiders – this is the story of one of Britain’s greatest characters.

The Brontes: a life in letters by Juliet Barker

The Brontes: a life in letters by Juliet Barker

This volume tells the well-known story of the family using original letters and autobiographical fragments. Through original sources we hear the authentic voices of the three sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne, their brother, Branwell, and their father, the Reverend Patrick Bronte.

It’s all going wonderfully well by Rosa Hoskins

It's all going wonderfully well by Rosa Hoskins

When Bob Hoskins died of Parkinson’s in 2014, his daughter posted a blog post called 11 Lessons from my Dad, which received an extraordinary response. In this emotional tribute, Rosa Hoskins remembers the times they shared – whether at home or on the set of Hook – and goes on a journey to learn more about him, gathering stories from the people he worked with over the years, including Robert De Niro and Helen Mirren.

Katherine Howard: the tragic story of Henry VIII’s fifth queen by Josephine Wilkinson

Katherine Howard: the tragic story of Henry VIII's fifth queen by Josephine Wilkinson

Katherine Howard was the fifth wife of Henry VIII and cousin to the executed Anne Boleyn. She first came to court as a young girl of fourteen, but even prior to that her fate had been sealed and she was doomed to die. She was beheaded in 1542 for crimes of adultery and treason, in one of the most sensational scandals of the Tudor age. The traditional story of Henry VIII’s fifth queen dwells on her sexual exploits before she married the king, and her execution is seen as her just dessert for having led a reckless life. However, the true story of Katherine Howard could not be more different.

The Co-op’s got bananas: a memoir of growing up in the post-war North by Hunter Davies

The Co-op's got bananas: a memoir of growing up in the post-war North by Hunter Davies

A poignant, and very personal childhood memoir of growing up in Cumbria during the Second World War and into the 1950s. A world of rationing where there were no sweets, no chocolate, no junk food. Education was free but few young people went to university. A more innocent age. Sunday Times columnist Hunter Davies eloquently takes us back to that period with this social memoir.

Girl up by Laura Bates

Girl up by Laura Bates

The author of Everyday Sexism is back, this time exposing the truth about the pressures surrounding body image, the false representations in media, the complexities of sex and relationships, the trials of social media and much more.

The girl in the spotty dress: memories from the 1950s, and the photo that changed my life by Pat Stewart and Veronica Clark

The girl in the spotty dress: memories from the 1950s, and the photo that changed my life by Pat Stewart and Veronica Clark

Another book about the 1950’s. This one is written by Pat Stewart who was immortalised by one of the iconic images of the 20th century. For years, an imposter named Norma Edmonton claimed to be the girl in the picture. After seeing Mrs Edmonton lying on The One Show, Pat Stewart stepped forward to reveal herself and tell her story. At the time of the photo 17-year-old Pat was a dancing ‘Tiller Girl’, and went on to high-kick her way from Blackpool Pier to the best (and worst) clubs in the West End. Over more than half a century in the showbiz industry, she became friends with some of the era’s great stars. This, finally, is the true story of the girl in the spotty dress.

Brandon King

I work in the Suffolk Libraries Stock Team