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New fiction for September 2015

Written by · Published Sep 1, 2015

Make me by Lee Child

Make me by Lee Child

Make me by Lee Child

Probably the most eagerly awaited fiction title in Suffolk! Jack Reacher arrives at a remote railroad stop and discovers a woman waiting for a missing private investigator, a cryptic note about 200 deaths, and a small town full of silent, watchful people. His one-day stopover looks like it is about to turn into something more complicated.

Purity by Jonathan Franzen

Purity by Jonathan Franzen

Young Pip Tyler doesn’t know who she is. She knows that her real name is Purity, that she has $130,000 in student debt, that she’s squatting with anarchists in Oakland and that her relationship with her mother – her only family – is hazardous. But she doesn’t have a clue who her father is, why her mother has always concealed her own real name, or how she can ever have a normal life. An encounter with a German peace activist leads Pip to South America and The Sunlight Project, an organisation that traffics in all the secrets of the world – including, Pip hopes, the secret of her origins.

Golden lion by Wilbur A Smith

Golden lion by Wilbur Smith

East African Coast, 1670. The Golden Bough, captained by Henry ‘Hal’ Courtney, is running south from Ethiopia to Zanzibar. Below deck, both his crew and his lover, the fearless warrior Judith Nazet, sleep. As the moon glints through clouds, Hal sights a ship passing close by. Although there is an uneasy truce between the warring English and Dutch, Hal scents danger. When the Bough is boarded, the crew must fight to defend their ship and their lives. But soon Hal will face even graver danger, as he discovers his mortal enemy still lives and is hell-bent on revenge.

Where my heart used to beat by Sebastian Faulks

Where my heart used to beat by Sebastian Faulks

A tender, brutal and thoughtful portrait of a man and a century, which asks whether, given the carnage we’ve witnessed and inflicted over the past 100 years, people can ever be the same?

Tennison by Lynda La Plante

Tennison by Lynda La Plante

Lynda La Plante goes back in time to 1972 to introduce us to a young Jane Tennison, memorably portrayed by Helen Mirren in Prime Suspect as she leaves the Metropolitan Police Training Academy to be placed on probationary exercise in Hackney where criminality thrives. We witness her struggle to cope in a male-dominated, chauvinistic environment, learning fast to deal with shocking situations with no help or sympathy from her superiors. Then comes her involvement in her first murder case.

The moth catcher by Ann Cleeves

The moth catcher by Ann Cleeves

The author of the Vera Stanhope series returns with a new murder mystery for her to solve.

Sweet caress: the many lives of Amory Clay by William Boyd

Sweet caress: the many lives of Amory Clay by William Boyd

The bestselling author of Any Human Heart returns with a sweeping story of a life fully lived told through the camera lens of one unforgettable woman, Amory Clay.

The blue guitar by John Banville

The blue guitar by John Banville

John Banville, the Man Booker Prize–winning author of The Sea and Ancient Light, presents his new novel about theft and betrayal.

Two years eight months and twenty-eight nights by Salman Rushdie

Two years eight months and twenty-eight nights by Salman Rushdie

Any new novel from Salman Rushdie is always a literary event. This is a spellbinding, entertaining, imaginative novel, which blends history and myth with tremendous philosophical depth. It is both very funny and terrifying.

Brandon King

I work in the Suffolk Libraries Stock Team