HomeRecommendations & reviewsAudiobooks → Recommended new audiobooks #7

Recommended new audiobooks #7

Written by · Published Mar 26, 2018

Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales, Tai-Pan, Everything is Illuminated

CD audiobooks

A Study in Scarlet, by Arthur Conan Doyle, read by Stephen Fry

“When Dr John Watson takes rooms in Baker Street with amateur detective Sherlock Holmes, he has no idea that he is about to enter a shadowy world of criminality and violence.”

Parting Shot, by Linwood Barclay, read by Jeff Harding

“When a young girl from Promise Falls is killed by a drunk driver, the community wants answers. It doesn’t matter that the accused is a kid himself: all they see is that he took a life and got an easy sentence. As pack mentality kicks in and social media outrage builds, vicious threats are made against the boy and his family.

“When Cal Weaver is called in to investigate, he finds himself caught up in a cold-blooded revenge plot. Someone in the town is threatening to put right some wrongs - and in Cal’s experience, it’s only ever a matter of time before threats turn into action.”

Life of Crime, by Kimberley Chambers, read by Annie Aldington

“Dragged up on a council estate, Jason Rampling was determined to change his lot. Jason’s a chancer, shameless with his good looks and his gift for earning a few quid. Life is easy when the money rolls in.

“Melissa thought she’d struck gold marrying Jason. Being on his arm meant she was finally a someone. But there’s no glamour in waiting for your husband to come home or waiting for a knock on the door. Melissa made her bed the day she made her vows - will she lie in it without a fight? After a stretch inside, Jason wants to pull off just one last job, the biggest of all. It could solve all of their problems. But this is a game that could cost them everything.”

An Unremarkable Body, by Elisa Lodato, read by Emma Powell

“When Katharine is found dead at the foot of her stairs, it is the mystery of her life which consumes daughter, Laura. The medical examiner’s report, in which precious parts of Katharine’s body are weighed and categorised, motivates Laura to write her own version of events. To bear witness to the unbearable blank space between each itemised entry.

“What emerges is a picture of life lived in the shadows, as well as an attempt to discover how and why her mother died. Laura is forced to confront a woman silenced by her own mother and wronged by her husband. A woman who felt shackled by motherhood and unable to love freely.”

Day of the Caesars, by Simon Scarrow, read by Jonathan Keeble

“The Emperor Claudius is dead. Nero rules. His half-brother Britannicus has also laid claim to the throne. A bloody power struggle is underway. All Prefect Cato and Centurion Macro want is a simple army life, fighting with their brave and loyal men.

“But Cato has caught the eye of rival factions determined to get him on their side. To survive, Cato must play a cunning game, and enlist the help of the one man in the Empire he can trust: Macro. As the rebel force grows, legionaries and Praetorian Guards are moved like chess pieces by powerful and shadowy figures. A political game has created the ultimate military challenge. Can civil war be averted?”

Anything is Possible, by Elizabeth Strout, read by Kimberley Farr

“Years ago, Lucy Barton, a successful New York writer, spent time in hospital, with her mother at the foot of her bed to keep her company. Avoiding the distance between them, they spoke at length about people from their home town, the rural, dusty town of Amgash, Illinois. Writing these stories, Lucy imagines the lives of the people that she especially remembers. And the people she has imagined that, in small ways, have remembered her too. For isn’t it true that we all hope to be remembered? Or to think in some way - even fleetingly - that we have been important to someone?”

Mothering Sunday, by Graham Swift, read by Eve Webster

“It is March 30th 1924. It is Mothering Sunday. How will Jane Fairchild, orphan and housemaid, occupy her time when she has no mother to visit? How, shaped by the events of this never to be forgotten day, will her future unfold?”

Peach, by Emma Glass, read by Yasmin Paige

“Something has happened to Peach. Blood runs down her legs and the scent of charred meat lingers on her flesh. It hurts to walk but she staggers home to parents that don’t seem to notice. They can’t keep their hands off each other and besides, they have a new infant, sweet and wobbly as a jelly baby. Peach must patch herself up alone so she can go to college and see her boyfriend, Green.

“But sleeping is hard when she is haunted by the gaping memory of a mouth, and working is hard when burning sausage fat fills her nostrils, and eating is impossible when her stomach is swollen tight as a drum.”

Sweet Little Lies, by Caz Freer, read by Jane Collingwood

“Cat Kinsella was always a daddy’s girl. Until the summer of 1998 when she sees her father flirting with 17-year-old Maryanne Doyle. When Maryanne later disappears and Cat’s father denies ever knowing her, Cat’s relationship with him is changed forever.

“18 years later, Cat is now a Detective Constable with the Met. Called to the scene of a murder in King’s Cross, she discovers a woman’s body: Alice Lapaine has been found strangled, not far from the pub that Cat’s father runs. When evidence links Alice to the still missing Maryanne, all Cat’s fears about her father resurface. Could he really be a killer?

“Determined to confront the past and find out what really happened to Maryanne all those years ago, Cat begins to look into the case. But when you dig into the past, you don’t always like what you find.”

The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne, read by Stephen Hogan

“Cyril Avery is not a real Avery - or at least that’s what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn’t a real Avery, then who is he?

“Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead.

“At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from - and over his three score years and ten, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country and much more.”

Edge of Darkness, by Karen Rose, read by Susie James

“Homicide detective Adam Kimble is no stranger to battling demons. But Meredith Fallon is a different kind of weakness: one that could actually be good for him, if only he would let himself depend on her. Meredith has loved Adam for a year, and seeing how hard he’s worked to deal with his PTSD makes her feelings only stronger, but she respects his needs.

“Her work keeps her busy anyway: she counsels sexually abused women like Mallory Martin to help them reintegrate into the world. But someone doesn’t want Meredith helping women like Mallory, and Meredith finds herself the target of a very determined killer.”

Deep Freeze, by John Sandford, read by Eric Conger

“Virgil knows the town of Trippton, Minnesota, a little too well. A few years back, he investigated the corrupt - and as it turned out, homicidal - local school board, and now the town’s back in view with more alarming news: A woman’s been found dead, frozen in a block of ice.

“There’s a possibility that it might be connected to a high school class of 20 years ago that has a mid-winter reunion coming up, and so, wrapping his coat a little tighter, Virgil begins to dig into 20 years’ worth of traumas, feuds, and bad blood. In the process, one thing becomes increasingly clear to him. It’s true what they say: High school is murder.”

The Maid’s Courage, by Rosie Goodwin, read by Charlie Sanderson

“Ginny is devastated by the death of her mother, her two little brothers and her sister. On top of that her father is imprisoned for murder, leaving Ginny and little brother Charlie without a home. With nowhere else to turn, she remembers her father’s last words - that she can ask the housekeeper of Lamp Hill Hall for help.

“Soon, Ginny is employed as a laundry maid. However, her beauty and grace mean that she catches the eye of the house’s mistress, who raises her up to play lady’s maid to the difficult and demanding Miss Diana. With Charlie sickly and in the workhouse, it will take all her strength of heart and courage to bring her family together again.”

Sleep Like a Baby, by Charlaine Harris, read by Thérèse Plummer

“In the latest installment of Charlaine Harris’s ‘Aurora Teagarden Mystery’ series, Robin and Aurora’s newborn Sophie is proving to be quite a handful. They hire a partially trained nurse, Virginia Mitchell, to come and help the new parents for a few weeks when Robin has to leave town for work and Roe is struck with a bad case of the flu.

“One particularly stormy night, Roe wakes to hear her daughter crying and Virginia nowhere to be found. Searching for her reveals a body outside - but it isn’t Virginia’s. Now, not only does Roe have a baby to care for but a new puzzle to contend with - who is this mystery woman dead in their backyard, and what happened to Virginia?”

The Guilty Wife, by Elle Croft, read by Victoria Fox

“Bethany Reston is happily married. But she’s also having an affair with a famous client. And no one can ever know.

“When Bethany’s lover is brutally murdered, she has to hide her grief from everyone. But someone knows her secret. And then one day the threats begin. With an ever-growing pile of evidence pointing to her as the murderer, the only way she can protect her secrets is to prove her innocence. And that means tracking down a killer.”

OverDrive

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Tai-Pan, by James Clavell, read by Gildart Jackson

“It is the early nineteenth century, when European traders and adventurers first began to penetrate the forbidding Chinese mainland. And it is in this exciting time and exotic place that a giant of an Englishman, Dirk Struan, sets out to turn the desolate island of Hong Kong into an impregnable fortress of British power — and to make himself supreme ruler: Tai-Pan!”

Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales, by BBC, read by various

“Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable, audiobook edition of Doctor Who: Time Lord Fairy Tales read by Tom Baker, Joanna Page, Adjoa Andoh, Ingrid Oliver, Anne Reid, Dan Starkey, Sophie Aldred, Rachael Stirling, Samuel Anderson, Nicholas Briggs, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Yasmin Paige, Michelle Gomez, Paul McGann and Andrew Brooke.

“A collection of dark and ancient fairy tales from the world of Doctor Who, these captivating stories include mysterious myths and legends about heroes and monsters of all kinds, from every corner of the universe. Originally told to young Time Lords at bedtime, these twisted tales are enchanting for Doctor Who fans of all ages.”

Everything is Illuminated, by Jonathan Safran Foer, read by Jeff Woodman & Scott Shina

“A young man arrives in the Ukraine, clutching in his hand a tattered photograph. He is searching for the woman who fifty years ago saved his grandfather from the Nazis.

“Unfortunately, he is aided in his quest by Alex, a translator with an uncanny ability to mangle English into bizarre new forms; a “blind” old man haunted by memories of the war; and an undersexed guide dog named Sammy Davis Jr, Jr.

“What they are looking for seems elusive — a truth hidden behind veils of time, language and the horrors of war. What they find turns all their worlds upside down.”

The World of Poo, by Terry Pratchett, read by Helen Atkinson Wood

“Vimes looked at the cover. The title was The World of Poo. When his wife was out of eyeshot he carefully leafed through it. Well, okay, you had to accept that the world had moved on and these days fairy stories were probably not going to be about twinkly little things with wings. As he turned page after page, it dawned on him that whoever had written this book, they certainly knew what would make kids like Young Sam laugh until they were nearly sick. The bit about sailing down the river almost made him smile.

“But interspersed with the scatology was actually quite interesting stuff about septic tanks and dunnakin divers and gongfermors and how dog muck helped make the very best leather, and other things that you never thought you would need to know, but once heard somehow lodged in your mind.”

Only Fools and Horses 2, by BBC, read by various

“The adventures of Del Boy and Rodney have become part of the nation’s consciousness, and for many years record-breaking audiences have followed their hilarious wheeling and dealing on BBC1.

“Now another four classic episodes from one of the funniest comedy programmes of all time are brought together on audio. So don’t be a plonker – do yourself a favour and get your hands on this little beauty. The episodes featured are Yesterday Never Comes May the Force be with You, Wanted, and Thicker Than Water.”

BorrowBox

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The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock, by Imogen Hermes Gowar, read by Juliet Stevenson

“One September evening in 1785, the merchant Jonah Hancock hears urgent knocking on his front door. One of his captains is waiting eagerly on the step. He has sold Jonah’s ship for what appears to be a mermaid.

“As gossip spreads through the docks, coffee shops, parlours and brothels, everyone wants to see Mr Hancock’s marvel. Its arrival spins him out of his ordinary existence and through the doors of high society. At an opulent party, he makes the acquaintance of Angelica Neal, the most desirable woman he has ever laid eyes on … and a courtesan of great accomplishment. This meeting will steer both their lives onto a dangerous new course, on which they will learn that priceless things come at the greatest cost.”

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, by Heather Morris, read by Richard Armitage

The Tattooist of Auschwitz is based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jews, who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia.

“In that terrible place, Lale was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival – literally scratching numbers into his fellow victims’ arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Lale used the infinitesimal freedom of movement that this position awarded him to exchange jewels and money taken from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he had been caught he would have been killed; many owed him their survival.

“Terrible though this story is, it is also a story of hope and of courage. It is also – almost unbelievably – a love story. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale – a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer – it was love at first sight and he determined not only to survive himself, but to ensure that Gita did, too. His story – their story – will make you weep, but you will also find it uplifting. It shows the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.”

Wideacre, by Philippa Gregory, read by Emma Powell

“Wideacre Hall, set in the heart of the English countryside, is the ancestral home that Beatrice Lacey loves. But as a woman of the 18th century, she has no right of inheritance. Corrupted by a world that mistreats women, she sets out to corrupt others.

“Sexual and willful, she believes that the only way to achieve control over Wideacre is through a series of horrible crimes, and no-one escapes the consequences of her need to possess the land.”

Oscar and Lucinda, by Peter Carey, read by Steven Crossley

“Oscar Hopkins, the hydrophobic, noisy-kneed son of a preacher, renounces his father’s stern religion in favour of the Anglican Church. Lucinda Leplastrier, a frizzy-haired heiress, impulsively buys a glass factory with the inheritance forced on her by a well-intentioned adviser.

“When the two finally meet, on board a ship to New South Wales, Australia they are bound by their affinity for gambling and risk, their loneliness, and their awkwardly blossoming mutual affection. Love will prove to be their ultimate gamble.”

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.