HomeRecommendations & reviewsAudiobooks → Recommended new audiobooks #15

Recommended new audiobooks #15

Written by · Published Nov 26, 2018

Harry Potter: A History of Magic, Bridge of Clay

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Dead Secret, by Janice Frost, read by Madeleine Brolly

“Amy Hill, a 19-year-old student, is strangled and her body dumped on open ground in the city. New police partners, D.I. Jim Neal and D.S. Ava Merry are called in to investigate this brutal crime. The last person to see Amy alive was Simon, the son of a family friend, but before he can be properly questioned he disappears.

“Detectives Neal and Merry are led on a trail of shocking family secrets and crimes. Can this duo track down the murderer before anyone else dies? Stopping this tragic cycle of violence will put D.S. Merry’s life at risk in a thrilling and heart-stopping finale.”

Normal People, by Sally Rooney, read by Aoife McMahon

“Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years.

“This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person’s life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege.”

Lethal White, by Robert Galbraith, read by Robert Glenister

“When Billy, a troubled young man, comes to private eye Cormoran Strike’s office to ask for his help investigating a crime he thinks he witnessed as a child, Strike is left deeply unsettled. Trying to get to the bottom of Billy’s story, Strike and Robin Ellacott - once his assistant, now a partner in the agency - set off on a twisting trail that leads them through the backstreets of London, into a secretive inner sanctum within Parliament, and to a beautiful but sinister manor house deep in the countryside. And during this labyrinthine investigation, Strike’s own life is far from straightforward. Plus, his relationship with his former assistant is more fraught than it ever has been.”

Dissolution, by C. J. Sansom, read by Steven Crossley

“Henry VIII has ordered the dissolution of the monasteries and England is full of informers. At the monastery of Scarnsea events have spiralled out of control with the murder of Commissioner Robin Singleton. Matthew Shardlake, a lawyer, and his assistant are sent to investigate.”

Also available: Dark Fire, Sovereign, Revelation and Heartstone.

A Measure of Darkness, by Jonathan & Jesse Kellerman, read by Robert G. Slade

“Clay Edison gets the call in the middle of the night and it’s a bad one. A party in Oakland, feuding neighbours, a wild crowd in the street. Two guns, firing at random, spreading chaos and death. Nobody knows the body count yet.

“It’s going to be a long night for Clay - longer than he ever could have imagined. Because when the dust settles, there’s a victim who can’t be accounted for. A young woman, strangled instead of shot, without ID and a stranger to all. Clay’s journey to give her a name and bring her justice will lead him into a bizarre world where right and wrong begin to blur.”

You Were Made for This, by Michelle Sacks, read by Olivia Mace, Lucy Scott & Sam Woolf

“In an idyllic house in a Swedish wood, Merry and her husband are building their new dream life with their young baby, far away from events that overshadowed their old life in New York. And they’re happy, aren’t they? Blissfully, blissfully happy.

“When Merry’s childhood friend Frances comes to stay, Frances barely recognises her old friend Merry, pureeing baby food, baking, living the Swedish dream. But little by little, cracks begin to show in her carefully constructed fairy tale.”

The Punishment She Deserves, by Elizabeth George, read by Peter Kenny

“When an MP shows up at New Scotland Yard requesting an investigation into the suicide of the son of one of his constituents, the Assistant Commissioner sees the opportunity to get rid of Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers. So he assigns Havers to the case and partners her with Detective Chief Superintendent Isabelle Ardery. But Ardery is not happy to be sent away from London and is in a rush to return.

“Soon, the case is opened again and this time, it is Lynley who must accompany Havers. And the more they investigate, the more it looks as if the suicide was part of a much more sinister pattern of events.”

The Story Keeper, by Anna Mazzola, read by Sarah Barron

“Audrey Hart is on the Isle of Skye to collect the word-of-mouth folk tales of the people and communities around her. It is 1857, the Highland Clearances have left devastation and poverty, and the crofters are suspicious and hostile, claiming they no longer know their stories.

“Then Audrey discovers the body of a young girl washed up on the beach and the crofters tell her that it is only a matter of weeks since another girl has disappeared. They believe the girls are the victims of the spirits of the unforgiven dead.

“Initially, Audrey is sure the girls are being abducted, but then she is reminded of her own mother, a Skye woman who disappeared in mysterious circumstances. It seems there is a link to be explored, and Audrey may uncover just what her family have been hiding from her all these years.”

This Is What Happened, by Mick Herron, read by Imogen Church

“26-year-old Maggie Barnes is someone you would never look at twice. Living alone in a month-to-month sublet in the huge city of London, with no family but an estranged sister, no boyfriend or partner, and not much in the way of friends, Maggie is just the kind of person who could vanish from the face of the earth without anyone taking notice. Or just the kind of person MI5 needs to infiltrate the establishment and thwart an international plot that puts all of Britain at risk.

“Now one young woman has the chance to be a hero - if she can think quickly enough to stay alive.”

Wild Fire, by Ann Cleeves, read by Kenny Blyth

“Drawn in by the reputation of the islands, a new English family move to the area, eager to give their autistic son a better life. But when a young nanny’s body is found hanging in the barn of their home, rumours of her affair with the husband begin to spread like wild fire.

“With suspicion raining down on the family, DI Jimmy Perez is called in to investigate, knowing that it will mean the return to the islands of his on-off lover and boss Willow Reeves, who will run the case.

“Perez is already facing the most disturbing investigation of his career, when Willow drops a bombshell that will change his life forever. Is he ready for what is to come?”

Nighthawk, by Clive Cussler, read by Graham Brown & Jeff Harding

“When the most advanced aircraft ever designed vanishes over the South Pacific, NUMA operatives Kurt Austin and Joe Zavala are drawn into a deadly contest to locate the fallen machine. Russia and China covet the radical technology, but the United States worries about a darker problem. They know what the others don’t: the X-37 is carrying a dangerous secret, a payload of exotic matter, extracted from the upper reaches of the atmosphere and stored at a temperature near absolute zero.”

The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman, read by Laurence Bouvard

“In the prequel to Practical Magic, we meet sisters Frances and Jet and Vincent, their brother. From the beginning their mother Susanna knew they were unique: Franny with her skin as pale as milk and blood red hair, who could commune with birds; Jet as shy as she is beautiful, who knows what others are thinking, and Vincent so charismatic that he was built for trouble.

“Susanna needed to set some rules of magic: no walking in the moonlight, no red shoes, no wearing black, no cats, no crows, no candles and certainly, absolutely, no books about magic. But the Owens siblings are desperate to uncover who they really are.”

Tall Order, by Stephen Leather, read by Paul Thornley

“He is one of the world’s most ruthless terrorists, codenamed Saladin. He plans and executes devastating attacks and then, ghost-like, he disappears. Ten years ago he blew a plane out of the sky above New York - and now he’s struck again, killing dozens in a London strike.

“But one of the latest victims is related to the acting head of MI5, who knows exactly who she wants on the case: Spider Shepherd. Dean Martin, a psychologically damaged former Navy SEAL, is the only person in the world who can identify Saladin. But Martin was killed ten years ago - wasn’t he?

“Shepherd must find Martin and take him back to the killing fields on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. Revenge on the world’s most wanted terrorist is long overdue, and Shepherd is determined to be the one to deliver it.”

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The Beach, by Alex Garland, read by Alfie Allen

“Richard lands in East Asia in search of an earthly utopia. In Thailand, he is given a map promising an unknown island, a secluded beach — and a new way of life. What Richard finds when he gets there is breathtaking: more extraordinary, more frightening than his wildest dreams.

“But how long can paradise survive here on Earth? And what lengths will Richard go to in order to save it?”

The Folklore of Discworld, written and read by Terry Pratchett & Jacqueline Simpson

“Most of us grow up having always known to touch wood or cross our fingers, and what happens when a princess kisses a frog or a boy pulls a sword from a stone, yet sadly some of these things are now beginning to be forgotten. Legends, myths, fairytales: our world is made up of the stories we told ourselves about where we came from and how we got there. It is the same on Discworld, except that beings which on Earth are creatures of the imagination - like vampires, trolls, witches and, possibly, gods - are real, alive and in some cases kicking on the Disc.

“In The Folklore of Discworld, Terry Pratchett teams up with leading British folklorist Jacqueline Simpson to take an irreverent yet illuminating look at the living myths and folklore that are reflected, celebrated and affectionately libelled in the uniquely imaginative universe of Discworld.”

The Fry Chronicles, written & read by Stephen Fry

“Much loved by the public and his peers, Stephen Fry is one of the most influential cultural forces in the country. This dazzling memoir promises to be a courageously frank, honest and poignant read. It will detail some of the most turbulent and least well known years of his life with a reading that will excite you, make you laugh uproariously, move you, inform you and, above all, surprise you.”

Meet Me in Malmö, by Torquil McLeod, read by Marguerite Gavin

“A British journalist is invited to Malmö to interview an old university friend who is now one of Sweden’s leading film directors. When he discovers the director’s glamorous film star wife dead in her apartment, the Skåne County Police are called in to solve the high-profile case.

“Among the investigating team is Inspector Anita Sundström, who soon finds the list of suspects growing. As Anita battles to discover the answers amid the antagonism of some of her colleagues, she even begins to think that the person she is becoming attracted to could be the murderer.”

Going Underground, by Michael Leese, read by Michael Healy

“Chief Inspector Brian Hooley has a plan and it won’t make him popular. He wants to bring back autistic detective Jonathan Roper.

“Currently suspended on misconduct charges, his condition, coupled with a relentless work-ethic, makes him a unique investigator with observational skills that allow him to see what others miss. But he is also a complex man who doesn’t get social boundaries and plenty of his colleagues just don’t like him.

“What follows is a roller coaster ride with the veteran cop about to find out what it’s like to be the subject of Roper’s unflinching gaze as his personal habits face intense scrutiny. This special relationship is warmly observed and provides a comic contrast to a darkly compelling story where the pair are pushed to the limit.”

Taste for Death, by P. D. James, read by Daniel Weyman

“Two men lie in a welter of blood in the vestry of St Matthew’s Church, Paddington, their throats brutally slashed. One is Sir Paul Berowne, a baronet and recently resigned Minister of the Crown, the other an alcoholic vagrant.

“Dalgliesh and his team, set up to investigate crimes of particular sensitivity, are faced with a case of extraordinary complexity as they discover the Berowne family’s veneer of prosperous gentility conceals ugly and dangerous secrets.”

Wrong Time, Wrong Place, by Simon Kernick, read by Clare Corbett

“Have you ever been in the wrong place at the wrong time?

“You are hiking in the Scottish highlands with three friends when you come across a girl.

“She is half-naked, has been badly beaten, and she can’t speak English. She is clearly running away from someone.

“Do you stop to help her? Even if it means putting your friends’ lives – and your own - in terrible danger?”

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Solitude: In pursuit of a singular life in a crowded world, by Michael Harris, read by Kerry Shale

“Solitude is a rapidly vanishing experience. Our society now embraces sharing like never before: time alone is being forced out of our lives by the constant pings of smartphones and prods of social media. But what if being alone still has something to offer us – something we have forgotten, but that we still desperately need?

“In Solitude, award-winning author Michael Harris examines why being alone matters now more than ever before. He reflects on the paradoxical feeling of isolation that emerges from being constantly connected – and on how learning the beauty of solitude can help us escape it. After all, it is when we are alone that we realise the greatest truths about ourselves. Being alone – really alone – could be the only antidote to the frenzy of our digital age.

“Rich with stories about the transformative power of solitude, and drawing on the research of the world’s leading neuroscientists and behavioural psychologists, Solitude offers a timely and profound exploration of how to be alone – and why it matters for us all.”

Dead Right, by Peter Robinson, read by Simon Slater

“The broken body of Jason Fox has been found in a dirty alleyway. At first it looks like a typical after-hours pub fight gone wrong. But Inspector Alan Banks soon realises that the truth is rarely so straightforward…

“Jason was a member of the Albion League, a white power organisation. And there are many people who might have wished him dead: the Pakistani youths he had insulted in the pub that evening; the shady friends of his business partner; or someone within the Albion League itself.

“And just as Banks begins to get a grip on the case, an unexpected discovery forces him to reconsider everything he believes…”

Harry Potter: A History of Magic, by Ben Davies, read by Natalie Dormer

Harry Potter: A History of Magic reveals some of the hidden stories behind real-world magic and explores some of J.K. Rowling’s magical inventions alongside their folkloric, cultural and historical forebears.

“Narrator Natalie Dormer and a host of experts will take you on an audio journey like no other; from ancient China, to a 14th century apothecary’s shop, on to the Salem witch trials and beyond. They delve into a rich body of writings about magic and explore intriguing artefacts to bring to life deep-rooted ideas of mysticism from around the world.

“Along the way, you can listen for handy tips on how to capture a basilisk, make yourself invisible or create your very own philosopher’s stone. You’ll hear about the dozens of drafts and drawings that went into J.K. Rowling’s writing process and enjoy exclusive interviews with Jim Dale, Stephen Fry and illustrator Jim Kay, who all share their experiences of working on these incredible stories.

“The extraordinary and thought-provoking tales in this audiobook are perfect for anyone who wants to know a little more about magic and the wizarding world.”

Murder Mile, by Lynda La Plante, read by Anna-Louise Plowman

“The fourth in the Sunday Times bestselling Jane Tennison thrillers, Murder Mile is set in 1979 at the height of the ‘Winter of Discontent’ when economic chaos has led to widespread strikes across Britain.

“Jane Tennison, now a Detective Sergeant, has been posted to Peckham CID, one of London’s toughest areas. As the rubbish on the streets begins to pile up, so does the murder count: two bodies in as many days.

“There are no suspects and the manner of death is different in each case. The only link between the two victims is the location of the bodies, found within a short distance of each other near Rye Lane in Peckham. Three days later another murder occurs in the same area. Press headlines scream that a serial killer is loose on ‘Murder Mile’ and that police incompetence is hampering the investigation.

“Jane is under immense pressure to catch the killer before they strike again. Working long hours with little sleep, what she uncovers leaves her doubting her own mind.”

The Adulterer’s Wife, by Leigh Russell, read by Phillipa Leigh

“Julie is devastated to learn that her husband, Paul, is having an affair. It seems her life can’t get any worse - until she comes home to find his dead body in their bed.

“When the police establish he was murdered, Julie is the obvious suspect. To protect her son from the terrible situation, Julie sends the teenage boy to his grandparents in Edinburgh while she fights to prove her innocence.

“With all the evidence pointing to her, the only way she can escape conviction is by discovering the true identity of her husband’s killer. But who really did murder Paul?

“The truth is never straightforward…”

Ambush, by James Patterson & James O. Born, read by Danny Mastrogiorgio

“Detective Michael Bennett’s enemies know where to find him.

“An anonymous tip about crime in Upper Manhattan proves to be a setup. An officer is taken down – but despite the attackers’ efforts, it’s not Michael Bennett.

“New York’s top cop is not the only one at risk. One of Bennett’s children is attacked. And a series of murders follows, each with a distinct signature, alerting Bennett to the presence of a professional killer.

“Bennett can’t tell what’s driving the assassin. But he can tell it’s personal.”

The Innocent, by David Baldacci, read by Ron McLarty & Orlagh Cassidy

“Back in DC after successful missions in Edinburgh and Tangier, assassin Will Robie sees his latest assignment, to eliminate a US government employee, go badly wrong. What had she done, or what did she know? Robie is now a wanted man.

“But it seems that he’s not the only one on the run. Young teenager Julie Getty is devastated by the inexplicable murder of her parents in their home. Who wanted them dead, and why, is a mystery. But Julie is smart enough to believe that their killer will come after her. Robie and Julie meet when he saves her from an attempt on her life as they were trying to leave town.

“The police investigating the hit start to take an interest in Robie. He’s particularly attracting the interest of Special Agent Nicole Vance, who believes that the two cases are connected. Robie finds himself in a dangerous position as he is tasked to investigate a crime at which he was present. Does he need to change sides to save lives – including his own?”

Patrick Melrose Volume 2, by Edward St Aubyn, read by Alex Jennings

“The once illustrious, once wealthy Melroses are in peril, and Patrick Melrose, now a husband and father, is trying to gather together the pieces of his life. Caught up in the turmoil of broken promises, assisted suicide, adultery and – most tender and terrifying of all – fatherhood, Patrick is still a long way from salvation, but even as the family struggles against the pull of its dark past, a new generation promises new light, new hope and – perhaps – the promise of a brighter future.

“Deeply moving, hilarious and heartbreaking, Patrick Melrose Volume 2 contains the final two novels in the Patrick Melrose series: Mother’s Milk and At Last.”

Bridge of Clay, written and read by Markus Zusak

“Here is a story told inside out and back to front:

“The five Dunbar brothers are living with their menagerie of animals in the perfect chaos of a house without grownups. Today, the father who walked out on them long ago is about to walk right back in.

“And so the life of Clay, the quiet one with a harrowing secret, is about to change forever.

“From a grandfather, whose passion for the ancient Greeks still lights up their lives, to a mother and father who fell in love over a mislaid piano, to the present day, where five sons co-exist in a house with no rules, Bridge of Clay is an sweeping portrait of how a ramshackle family, held together by stories and by love, come to unbury one boy’s tragic secret.

“This tale of a young life caught in a current – a life in search of greatness and the cure for a painful past – is as intense, inspiring and ambitious as only Markus Zusak can be.”

The Fox, by Frederick Forsyth, read by David Rintoul

“Most weapons do what you tell them. Most weapons you can control.

“But what if the most dangerous weapon in the world isn’t a smart missile or a stealth submarine or even an AI computer program? What if it’s a 17-year-old boy with a blisteringly brilliant mind, who can run rings around the most sophisticated security services across the globe, who can manipulate that weaponry and turn it against the superpowers themselves? How valuable would he be? And what wouldn’t you do to get hold of him?

The Fox is a race-against-time thriller across continents to find and capture, or protect and save, an asset with the means to change the balance of world power. Whatever happens he must not fall into the wrong hands. Because what follows after that is unthinkable…”

The House Across the Street, by Lesley Pearse, read by Rosie Jones

“Twenty-three-year-old Katy Speed is fascinated by the house across the street. The woman who lives there, Gloria, is the most glamorous neighbour on the avenue, owning a fashionable dress shop in Bexhill-on-Sea. But who is the woman who arrives in the black car most Saturdays while Gloria is at work? Sometimes she brings women to the house, other times they have children.

“Hilda, Katy’s mother, disapproves of Gloria. She wonders if these mysterious visitors have just been released from prison. Is Gloria secretly bringing criminals, or worse, into the heart of the community?

“Then one night, the house burns down. In the wreckage, the bodies of Gloria and her daughter are found. Katy is sure the unexplained visitors must be responsible until her father is arrested and charged with murder. Have the police arrested the correct person? Are the rest of the street safe? Can Katy find the truth before it’s too late?”

The Lie Tree, by Frances Hardinge, read by Emilia Fox

“Faith’s father has been found dead under mysterious circumstances, and as she is searching through his belongings for clues she discovers a strange tree. The tree only grows healthy and bears fruit if you whisper a lie to it. The fruit of the tree, when eaten, will deliver a hidden truth to the person who consumes it. The bigger the lie, the more people who believe it, the bigger the truth that is uncovered.

“The girl realises that she is good at lying and that the tree might hold the key to her father’s murder, so she begins to spread untruths far and wide across her small island community. But as the tree bears more and more fruit, she discovers something terrifying - that her lies were closer to the truth than she could ever have imagined.”

The Little Snake, written and read by A. L. Kennedy

“This is the story of Mary, a young girl born in a beautiful city full of rose gardens and fluttering kites. When she is still very small, Mary meets Lanmo, a shining golden snake, who becomes her very best friend. The snake visits Mary many times, he sees her city change, become sadder as bombs drop and war creeps in. He sees Mary and her family leave their home, he sees her grow up and he sees her fall in love.

“But Lanmo knows that the day will come when he can no longer visit Mary, when his destiny will break them apart, and he wonders whether having a friend can possibly be worth the pain of knowing you will lose them.”

Tombland, by C. J. Sansom, read by Steven Crossley

“Two years after the death of Henry VIII, England is sliding into chaos. The nominal king, Edward VI, is eleven years old. His uncle Edward Seymour, Lord Hertford, rules as Protector. The extirpation of the old religion by radical Protestants is stirring discontent among the populace while the Protector’s prolonged war with Scotland is proving a disastrous failure and threatens to involve France. Worst of all, the economy is in collapse, inflation rages and rebellion is stirring among the peasantry.

“Since the old King’s death, Matthew Shardlake has been working as a lawyer in the service of Henry’s younger daughter, the Lady Elizabeth. The gruesome murder of Edith Boleyn, the wife of John Boleyn - a distant Norfolk relation of Elizabeth’s mother - which could have political implications for Elizabeth, brings Shardlake and his assistant Nicholas Overton to the summer assizes at Norwich.”

Absolute Proof, by Peter James, read by Hugh Bonneville

“Investigative reporter Ross Hunter nearly didn’t answer the phone call that would change his life – and possibly the world – for ever.

“‘I’d just like to assure you I’m not a nutcase, Mr Hunter. My name is Dr Harry F. Cook. I know this is going to sound strange, but I’ve recently been given absolute proof of God’s existence – and I’ve been advised there is a writer, a respected journalist called Ross Hunter, who could help me to get taken seriously.’

“What would it take to prove the existence of God? And what would be the consequences? This question and its answer lie at the heart of Absolute Proof, an international thriller from bestselling author Peter James.

“The false faith of a billionaire evangelist, the life’s work of a famous atheist, and the credibility of each of the world’s major religions are all under threat. If Ross Hunter can survive long enough to present the evidence…”

A Column of Fire, by Ken Follett, read by John Lee

“Young Ned Willard is coming home to Kingsbridge at Christmas as this story opens. The year 1558 will turn his life upside-down and change Europe forever.

“The ancient stones of Kingsbridge Cathedral look down on a city torn by religious hatred. High principles clash bloodily with friendship, loyalty and love. Ned finds himself on the opposite side from the girl he longs to marry, Margery Fitzgerald.

“When Elizabeth Tudor becomes queen, all of Europe turns against England. The shrewd, determined young monarch sets up the country’s first secret service, to give her early warning of assassination plots, rebellions and invasion plans. Waiting in Paris is the alluring, headstrong Mary Queen of Scots, part of a brutally ambitious French family. Proclaimed the rightful ruler of England, she has her own supporters scheming to get rid of Elizabeth.”

Courtney’s War, by Wilbur Smith, read by Sean Barrett

“Paris, 1939. Torn apart by war, Saffron Courtney and Gerhard von Meerbach are thousands of miles apart, both struggling for their lives. Gerhard – despite his objections to the Nazi regime – is fighting for the Fatherland, hoping to one day have the opportunity to rid Germany of Hitler and his cronies. But as his unit is thrown into the hellish attrition of the Battle of Stalingrad, he knows his chances of survival are dwindling by the day.

“Meanwhile, Saffron – recruited by the Special Operations Executive and sent to occupied Belgium to discover how the Nazis have infiltrated SOE’s network – soon finds herself being hunted by Germany’s most ruthless spymaster. Confronted by evil beyond their worst imaginings, the lovers must each make the hardest choice of all: sacrifice themselves, or do whatever they can to survive, hoping that one day they will be reunited.”

Crisis, by Felix Frances, read by Martin Jarvis

“Harrison Foster is a lawyer by training but works as a crisis manager for a London firm that specializes in such matters. Summoned to Newmarket after a fire in the Chadwick Stables slaughters six very valuable horses, including the short-priced favourite for the Derby, Harry (as he is known) finds there is far more to the ‘simple’ fire than initially meets the eye.

“For a start, human remains are found amongst the equestrian ones in the burnt-out shell. All the stable staff are accounted for, so who is the mystery victim? Harry knows very little about horses, indeed he positively dislikes them, but he is thrust unwillingly into the world of Thoroughbred racing where the standard of care of the equine stars is far higher than that of the humans who attend to them.”

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, read by Thandie Newton

“Following Jane from her childhood as an orphan in Northern England through her experience as a governess at Thornfield Hall, Charlotte Brontë’s Gothic classic is an early exploration of women’s independence in the mid-19th century and the pervasive societal challenges women had to endure. At Thornfield, Jane meets the complex and mysterious Mr. Rochester, with whom she shares a complicated relationship that ultimately forces her to reconcile the conflicting passions of romantic love and religious piety.

Performing the early Victorian novel with great care and respect, actress Thandie Newton (Crash, The Pursuit of Happyness) draws out Jane Eyre’s intimacy and depth while conveying how truly progressive Brontë was in an era of extreme restraint.”

Room, by Emma Donoghue, read by Michal Friedman, Robert Petkoff, Ellen Archer & Suzanne Toren

“It’s Jack’s birthday, and he’s excited about turning five.

“Jack lives with his Ma in Room, which has a locked door and a skylight, and measures 11 feet by 11 feet. He loves watching TV, and the cartoon characters he calls friends, but he knows that nothing he sees on screen is truly real - only him, Ma and the things in Room. Until the day Ma admits that there’s a world outside…”

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.