HomeRecommendations & reviewsAudiobooks → Recommended new audiobooks #14

Recommended new audiobooks #14

Written by · Published Oct 29, 2018

Happiness, Things Bright and Beautiful

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Happiness, by Aminatta Forna, read by Robin Miles

“Waterloo Bridge, London. Two strangers collide. Attila, a Ghanaian psychiatrist, and Jean, an American studying the habits of urban foxes.

“From this chance encounter in the midst of the rush of a great city, numerous moments of connections span out and interweave, bringing disparate lives together. Attila has arrived in London with two tasks: to deliver a keynote speech on trauma and to check up on the daughter of friends, his ‘niece’, Ama, who hasn’t called home in a while. It soon emerges that she has been swept up in an immigration crackdown - and now her young son Tano is missing.

“When by chance Attila bumps into Jean again, she joins him in his search for Tano, mobilising into action the network she has built up, mainly from the many West African immigrants working London’s myriad streets, of volunteer fox-spotters: security guards, hotel doormen, traffic wardens.”

Body and Soul, by John Harvey, read by Gordon Griffin

“When his estranged daughter Katherine suddenly appears on his doorstep, Elder knows that something is badly wrong. The breakdown of her relationship with a controversial artist has sent her into a self-destructive tailspin which culminates in murder. And as Elder struggles to protect Katherine and prove her innocence, the terrors of the past threaten them both once more.”

Killing It, by Asia Mackay, read by Georgia Maguire

“Every working mum has had to face it. The guilt-fuelled, anxiety-filled first day back in the office after maternity leave. But this working mum is one of a kind.

“Meet Alexis Tyler. An elite covert agent within Her Majesty’s Secret Service. Her first project back is a high-stakes hit of global significance and the old boys’ network of government espionage is far from ready for the return of an operational mother. But woe betide anyone who ever tells Alexis Tyler ‘you can’t’. She will have it all. Or she’ll die trying. And yes, she damn well will be home for bath time.”

Bitter Sun, by Beth Lewis, read by Christopher Ragland

“In the heatwave summer of 1971, four kids find a body by a lake and set out to solve a murder. But they dig too deep and ask too many questions. Larson is a town reeling in the wake of the Vietnam draft, where the unrelenting heat ruins the harvest, and the people teeter on the edge of ruin. As tension and paranoia run rife, rumours become fact, violence becomes reflex.”

The Reason I Jump, by Naoki Higashida & David Mitchell (trans.), read by Thomas Judd

“Written by Naoki Higishida when he was only 13, this remarkable book explains the often baffling behaviour of autistic children and shows the way they think and feel - such as about the people around them, time and beauty, noise, and themselves. Naoki abundantly proves that autistic people do possess imagination, humour and empathy, but also makes clear, with great poignancy, how badly they need our compassion, patience and understanding.”

The Mum Who’d Had Enough, by Fiona Gibson, read by Paul Tyreman, Rachael-Louise Miller, Nigel Pilkington & Sara Pyzer

“Nate Turner has a nice life. He has a steady job as a driving examiner and lives with his wife Sinead and son Flynn in a lovely house in a good part of town. Yes, it’s a very nice life. Until one morning Nate comes downstairs to find Sinead gone and a note lying on the kitchen table, listing all the many things that Nate does wrong - or doesn’t do at all.

“Now, somehow, Nate needs to show Sinead he can change - fast. But as Nate works on being a better husband and dad, his life changes in amazing and unexpected ways. And he starts to wonder whether he wants to go back to normal after all. Could there be more to life than nice?”

The Cliff House, by Amanda Jennings, read by Joan Walker

“Cornwall, summer of 1986. The Davenports, with their fast cars and glamorous clothes, living the dream in a breathtaking house overlooking the sea. If only - thinks sixteen-year-old Tamsyn, her binoculars trained on the perfect family in their perfect home. If only her life was as perfect as theirs. If only Edie Davenport would be her friend. If only she lived at The Cliff House.”

Accidental Heroes, by Danielle Steel, read by James Frangione

“On a beautiful May morning at New York’s JFK Airport, a routine plane departs for San Francisco. Security agent Bernice Adams finds a postcard of the Golden Gate Bridge bearing an ambiguous message. Who left the postcard behind, which flight is that person on, and what exactly does the message mean? Her supervisor dismisses her concerns but she is compelled to contact Homeland Security.

“As the flight takes off each of the passengers is looking forward to reaching San Francisco, whether it’s for a family reunion, a wedding, or a new way of life. But as it emerges, there’s someone on the flight planning something terrible and these strangers’ lives entwine as they come together to help to avert a tragedy at the eleventh hour.”

The Wife, by Alafair Burke, read by Jane Perry

“When Angela met Jason Powell, while catering a function in the Hamptons, she assumed their romance would be a short-lived fling, but Jason, a brilliant economics professor at NYU, had other plans, and they married the following summer. For Angela, the marriage turned out to be a chance to start again, for her and her young son to move from her mother’s home to Manhattan, where no one knew of her tragic past.

“Six years later, thanks to a best-selling book and a growing media career, Jason has become a celebrated liberal figurehead, placing Angela near the spotlight she worked so carefully to avoid. When a college intern makes an accusation against Jason, and another woman, Kerry Lynch, comes forward with an even more troubling allegation, their perfect life begins to unravel. Jason insists he is innocent, but increasingly Angela is forced to ask how well she ever really knew her husband.”

Five Years From Now, by Paige Toon, read by Katie Lyons

“Vian and Nell are thrown together at the age of five when Vian’s mother and Nell’s father fall in love. At first wary of each other, they soon become the best of friends. But five years later, they are torn apart and Vian moves to the other side of the world.

“Fast-forward five more years to when Vian comes to visit, and Nell discovers that the boy she once knew is now ‘Van’ - a wild and carefree teenager. Chemistry crackles, but once again, they’re separated. For the next two decades, Nell and Van meet every five years, but life and circumstance always intervene. Will they ever find true happiness? And will it be together?”

Things Bright and Beautiful, by Anbara Salam, read by Julia Franklin

“1954, the South Pacific islands. When Beatriz Hanlon agreed to accompany her missionary husband Max to a remote island, she knew there would be challenges. But it isn’t just the heat and the damp and the dirt. There are more insects than she could ever have imagined, and the islanders are strangely hostile. And then there are the awful noises coming from the church at night.

“Yet as the months go by, Bea slowly grows accustomed to life on the island. That is until an unexpected and interminably humming guest arrives, and the couple’s claustrophobic existence is stretched to breaking point. Events draw to a terrible climax, and Bea watches helplessly as her husband’s guilt drives him into madness. It’s not long before Bea finds herself fighting for her freedom, and her life.”

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Wartime at Woolworths, by Elaine Everest, read by Annie Aldington

“Fun loving Maisie is devoted to her young family and her work at Woolworths. But her happy life with her RAF officer husband, their baby daughter leads her to think of the family she left behind… With the war now into its fourth year, what will she find when she sets about searching for them?

“Sarah and her husband, Alan, are blissfully happy and long for a sibling for their daughter. But dark days lay ahead for this close family.

“Freda heads home to Birmingham, to go in search of her family, back to the life she fled – far from the safety of Woolworths and her new friends.

“With families separated by war, will the Woolworths girls be able to pull together?”

Everything I Know About Love, written and read by Dolly Alderton

“When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod Stewart-themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you’ve ever been able to rely on, and finding that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It’s a book about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

“Glittering with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton’s powerful debut weaves together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age – while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.”

Give Me Your Hand, by Megan Abbott, read by Chloe Cannon

“Kit has risen to the top of her profession and is on the brink of achieving everything she wanted. She hasn’t let anything stop her.

“But now someone else is standing in her way – Diane. Best friends at seventeen, their shared ambition made them inseparable. Until the day Diane told Kit her secret – the worst thing she’d ever done, the worst thing Kit could imagine – and it blew their friendship apart.

“Kit is still the only person who knows what Diane did. And now Diane knows something about Kit that could destroy everything she’s worked so hard for.

“How far would Kit go, to make the hard work, the sacrifice, worth it in the end? What wouldn’t she give up? Diane thinks Kit is just like her. Maybe she’s right.”

It All Falls Down, by Sheena Kamal, read by Bahni Turpin

“When Nora Watts is approached by a man claiming to know her late father, she is thrown into turmoil. Struggling with the imminent death, from cancer, of her friend and mentor Sebastian Crow, she is unprepared for the memories that this encounter brings back. What happened to her father that made him kill himself and abandon Nora and her sister?

“Heading to Detroit to try and find some answers about his life there, Nora expects to discover a reason behind his suicide. Instead, she finds more questions than answers.

“But trouble always follows Nora, and it’s found her in Detroit, a city that is as broken as she is.”

This is Going to Hurt, written and read by Adam Kay

“Welcome to 97-hour weeks. Welcome to life and death decisions. Welcome to a constant tsunami of bodily fluids. Welcome to earning less than the hospital parking meter. Wave goodbye to your friends and relationships…

“Welcome to the life of a junior doctor.

“Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, comedian and former junior doctor Adam Kay’s This Is Going to Hurt provides a no-holds-barred account of his time on the NHS front line. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking by turns, these diaries are everything you wanted to know – and more than a few things you didn’t – about life on and off the hospital ward. And yes, it may leave a scar.”

The Clockmaker’s Daughter, by Kate Morton, read by Joanne Froggatt

“In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor in rural Oxfordshire. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe’s life is in ruins.

“Over 150 years later, Elodie Winslow, a young archivist in London, uncovers a leather satchel containing two seemingly unrelated items: a sepia photograph of an arresting-looking woman in Victorian clothing, and an artist’s sketchbook containing the drawing of a twin-gabled house on the bend of a river.

“Why does Birchwood Manor feel so familiar to Elodie? And who is the beautiful woman in the photograph? Will she ever give up her secrets?

“Told by multiple voices across time, The Clockmaker’s Daughter is a story of murder, mystery and thievery, of art, love and loss. And flowing through its pages like a river, is the voice of a woman who stands outside time, whose name has been forgotten by history, but who has watched it all unfold: Birdie Bell, the clockmaker’s daughter.”

Ghost Wall, by Sarah Moss, read by Christine Hewitt

“Teenage Silvie is living in a remote Northumberland camp as an exercise in experimental archaeology. Her father is an abusive man, obsessed with recreating the discomfort, brutality and harshness of Iron Age life.

“Behind and ahead of Silvie’s narrative is the story of a bog girl, a sacrifice, a woman killed by those closest to her, and as the hot summer builds to a terrifying climax, Silvie and the Bog girl are in ever more terrifying proximity.”

Juror No. 3, by James Patterson & Nancy Alan, read by Megan Tusing

“Ruby Bozarth, a newcomer to Rosedale, Mississippi, is also fresh to the Mississippi Bar – and to the docket of Circuit Judge Baylor, who taps Ruby as defence counsel in a racially charged felony.

“The murder of a woman from one of the town’s oldest families has Rosedale’s upper crust howling for blood, and the prosecutor is counting on Ruby’s inexperience to help him deliver a swift conviction. Ruby’s client is a college football star who has returned home after a career-ending injury, and she is determined to build a defence that will stick.

“Ruby never belonged to the country-club set, but once she nearly married into it. As news breaks of a second murder, Ruby’s ex-fiancé, Lee Greene, shows up on her doorstep – a Southern gentleman in need of a saviour.

“As lurid, intertwining investigations unfold, no one in Rosedale can be trusted, especially the twelve men and women impanelled on the jury. They may be hiding the biggest secret of all.”

Patrick Melrose Volume 1, by Edward St Aubyn, read by Alex Jennings

“Moving from Provence to New York to Gloucestershire, from the savageries of a childhood with a cruel father and an alcoholic mother to an adulthood fraught with addiction, Patrick Melrose is on a mission to escape himself.

“But the drugs don’t make him forget his past, and the glittering parties offer him no redemption…

“Searingly funny and deeply humane, Patrick Melrose Volume 1 contains the first three novels in the Patrick Melrose series, Never Mind, Bad News and Some Hope.”

Nine Perfect Strangers, by Liane Moriarty, read by Caroline Lee

“Could ten days at a health resort really change you forever? Nine perfect strangers are about to find out …

“The ten-day retreat at boutique health-and-wellness resort Tranquillum House promises healing and transformation. Nine stressed city dwellers are keen to drop their literal and mental baggage and absorb the blissful meditative ambience while enjoying their hot stone massages. They are all on a path to a better way of living. Or at least a better waistline…

“Watching over them is the resort’s director, a woman on a mission to reinvigorate these tired bodies and minds. But to what lengths will she go to achieve her goal?

“These nine perfect strangers have no idea what’s about to hit them.”

Their Lost Daughters, by Joy Ellis, read by Richard Armitage

“Deep in the muddy fields of the Lincolnshire Fens, a teenage girl is found wandering, delirious, claiming to have been drugged at a party. Metres away, the drowned body of another girl is found on an isolated beach. And all this on a small stretch of land where, nearly 10 years ago, the shocking disappearance of a young girl remains an open case.

“For DI Rowan Jackman and DS Marie Evans, the pressure is on to bring the perpetrators of these shocking crimes to justice. Are the crimes linked? Who are these young girls? And what on earth is going on under the green and pastured land of the Lincolnshire Fens?”

The Courage to be Disliked, by Fumitake Koga & Ichiro Kishimi, read by Adrian Mulraney

The Courage to be Disliked shows you how to unlock the power within yourself to become your best and truest self, change your future and find lasting happiness. Using the theories of Alfred Adler, one of the three giants of 19th century psychology alongside Freud and Jung, the authors explain how we are all free to determine our own future free of the shackles of past experiences, doubts and the expectations of others. It’s a philosophy that’s profoundly liberating, allowing us to develop the courage to change, and to ignore the limitations that we and those around us can place on ourselves.”

Recovery: freedom from our addictions, written and read by Russell Brand

“This is the age of addiction, a condition so epidemic, so all encompassing and ubiquitous that unless you are fortunate enough to be an extreme case, you probably don’t know that you have it.

“What unhealthy habits and attachments are holding your life together? Are you unconsciously dependent on food? Bad relationships? A job that doesn’t fulfil you? Numb, constant perusal of your phone, looking for what?

“My qualification for writing this book is not that I am better than you, it’s that I am worse. I am an addict, addicted to drugs, alcohol, sex, money, love and fame.

“The program in Recovery has given Russell Brand freedom from all addictions and it will do the same for you. This system offers nothing less than liberation from self-centredness, a new perspective, freedom from the illusion of suffering for anyone who is willing to take the necessary steps.”

The Ten Types of Human: a new understanding of who we are, by Dexter Dias, read by Tom Clegg

“We have within us the ability to perform acts of great kindness, and great evil. We would like to think that there are some things that we would always do, and some things that we would never do. But how can we know?

“The answers lie with the Ten Types of Human: the people we become when we are faced with the most difficult decisions. But who are they? Where are they from? And how did they get into your head?

The Ten Types of Human is a pioneering examination of human nature. It explores how our minds work, and examines what forces come into play when we are placed in extreme situations. It begins in a courtroom, and journeys across four continents in search of answers.

“Mixing cutting-edge neuroscience, social psychology and visceral true stories, The Ten Types of Human is at once a handbook, a provocation and a road map. It is an audiobook to inspire us, and to help us find new ways to be free.”

A Manual for Heartache, written and read by Cathy Rentzenbrink

“When Cathy Rentzenbrink was still a teenager, her happy family was torn apart by an unthinkable tragedy. In A Manual for Heartache she describes how she learned to live with grief and loss and find joy in the world again. She explores how to cope with life at its most difficult and overwhelming and how we can emerge from suffering forever changed, but filled with hope.

“This is a moving, warm and uplifting book that offers solidarity and comfort to anyone going through a painful time, whatever it might be. It’s a book that will help to soothe an aching heart and assure its readers that they’re not alone.”

Override: my quest to go beyond brain training and take control of my mind, written and read by Caroline Williams

“Can you really rewire an adult brain?

“In theory the answer is ‘yes’, but there’s a problem: no-one seems to know exactly how to do it.

“In Override, science journalist Caroline Williams sets off on a mission to find the answer. Delving into the latest studies on brain plasticity, which indicate that brain games don’t actually do much to make you smarter, she tries to square her findings with the reality of brain plasticity – that the brain adapts physically as we learn something new.

“Visiting top neuroscientists in their labs, Williams volunteers herself as a guinea pig in neuroscience studies, challenging researchers to make real changes to her – functioning, but imperfect – brain. Seeking first to improve on her own weaknesses, such as a limited attention span and a tendency to worry too much, she then branches out into more mysterious areas such as intelligence, creativity and the perception of time.

“Trying everything from high-tech brain stimulation to meditation, adding bolt-on senses and retraining her stress response, Override is a very intimate, fascinating journey into discovering what neuroscience can really do for us – and, crucially, whether it’s worth all the bother.”

Happiness by Design: finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, by Paul Dolan, read by Jonathan Cowley

“As a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, Dolan conducts original research into the measurement of happiness and its causes and consequences, including the effects of our behaviour. Here he creates a new outlook on the pursuit of happiness – it’s not just how you feel, it’s how you act.

Happiness by Design shows that being happier requires us to actively re-design our immediate environment. Enough has been written on how to think happy. Happiness by Design is about how to behave happy and how to incorporate the most recent research findings into our everyday lives.”

What I Know For Sure, written and read by Oprah Winfrey

“In the first issue of O, The Oprah Magazine, Oprah wrote: ‘We are all the causes of our own effects… That’s why I’ll never stop asking the question, “What do you know for sure?”’

“In the fourteen years since Oprah wrote those words, she has retired The Oprah Winfrey Show (the highest-rated programme of its kind in history), launched her own television network, become America’s only black billionaire, lost beloved pets and adopted new ones, watched friends and colleagues come and go, celebrated milestone birthdays - and through it all, she’s continued to offer profound and inspiring words of wisdom in her monthly O column, What I Know For Sure.

“Now, for the first time, these thoughtful gems have been revised, updated and collected in What I Know For Sure, a beautiful book packed with insight and revelation from Oprah Winfrey. Organized by theme, these essays offer a rare and powerful glimpse into the mind of one of the world’s most extraordinary women. Candid, moving, exhilarating, uplifting and dynamic, the words Oprah shares in What I Know For Sure shimmer with the sort of wisdom and truth that readers will turn to again and again.”

The Art of Being Brilliant, by Andy Whittaker & Andy Cope, read by Glen McCready

“Andy Cope and Andy Whittaker are experts in the art of happiness and positive psychology and The Art of Being Brilliant is crammed full of good advice, instructive case studies, inspiring quotes, some funny stuff and important questions to make you think about your work, relationships and life.

“You see, being brilliant, successful, and happy isn’t about dramatic change, it’s about finding out what really works for you and doing more of it. The authors lay down their six common-sense principles that will ensure you focus on what you’re good at and become super-brilliant both at work and at home.”

Meditations for Stressful Situations: finding peace in the everyday, by David Michie, read by Nicholas Bell

“Stress is a constant presence in our everyday lives – more than ever before, we’re working harder, juggling more responsibilities and taking less time for ourselves.

“David Michie, the bestselling author of Buddhism for Busy People, offers a series of meditations designed to take those moments in life that seem unbearably stressful, and gives you the calmness and peace of mind to take control of the situation, and of yourself.”

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The Couple Next Door, by Shari Lapena, read by Kirsten Potter

“Your neighbour told you that she didn’t want your six-month-old daughter at the dinner party. Nothing personal, she just couldn’t stand her crying.

“Your husband said it would be fine. After all, you only live next door. You’ll have the baby monitor and you’ll take it in turns to go back every half hour.

“Your daughter was sleeping when you checked on her last. But now, as you race up the stairs in your deathly quiet house, your worst fears are realised. She’s gone.

“You’ve never had to call the police before. But now they’re in your home, and who knows what they’ll find there.

“What would you be capable of, when pushed past your limit?”

Everything I Know About Love, written and read by Dolly Alderton

“When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod Stewart-themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you’ve ever been able to rely on, and finding that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It’s a book about bad dates, good friends and – above all else – about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

“Glittering with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton’s powerful debut weaves together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age – while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.”

The Murder Room, by P. D. James, read by Daniel Weyman

“Commander Adam Dalgliesh is already acquainted with the Dupayne Museum in Hampstead, and with its sinister murder room celebrating notorious crimes committed in the interwar years, when he is called to investigate the killing of one of the trustees. He soon discovers that the victim was seeking to close the museum against the wishes of both staff and fellow trustees. Everyone, it seems, has something to gain from the crime.

“When it becomes clear that the killer is prepared to kill again, inspired by the real-life crimes from the murder room, Dalgliesh knows that to solve this case he has to get into the mind of a ruthless killer.

“The investigation is complicated for Dalgliesh by his love for Emma Lavenham, but their relationship, at a sensitive stage for them both, is continually frustrated by the demands of his job. As step by step he moves closer to the murderer, is the investigation taking him further away from commitment to the woman he loves?”

Jaws, by Peter Benchley, read by Erik Steele

“This timeless tale of man-eating terror that spawned a movie franchise, two video games, a Universal Studios theme park attraction, and two musicals is finally available on audio for the first time ever.”

The Naked Mind: control alcohol, written and read by Annie Grace

“Millions of people worry that drinking is affecting their health, yet are unwilling to seek change because of the misery and stigma associated with alcoholism and recovery. They fear drinking less will be boring, difficult and involve deprivation, and significant lifestyle changes.

“This Naked Mind offers a new solution. Packed with surprising insight into the reasons we drink, it will open your eyes to the startling role of alcohol in our culture. Annie Grace brilliantly weaves psychological, neurological, cultural, social and industry factors with her extraordinarily candid journey resulting in a must read for anyone who drinks. This book, without scare tactics, pain or rules, gives you freedom from alcohol.”

The Language of Kindness: a nurse’s story, written and read by Christie Watson

“Christie Watson was a nurse for twenty years. Taking us from birth to death and from A&E to the mortuary, The Language of Kindness is an astonishing account of a profession defined by acts of care, compassion and kindness.

“We watch Christie as she nurses a premature baby who has miraculously made it through the night, we stand by her side during her patient’s agonising heart-lung transplant, and we hold our breath as she washes the hair of a child fatally injured in a fire, attempting to remove the toxic smell of smoke before the grieving family arrive.

“In our most extreme moments, when life is lived most intensely, Christie is with us. She is a guide, mentor and friend. And in these dark days of division and isolationism, she encourages us all to stretch out a hand.”

Death of Kings, by Bernard Cornwell, read by Stephen Perring

“As the ninth century wanes, King Alfred is dying and his passing threatens the island of Britain to renewed warfare. Alfred wants his son, Edward, to succeed him but there are other Saxon claimants to the throne.

“As the king’s warrior, Uhtred knows that he will either be the means of making Alfred’s dream of a united and Christian England come to pass or be responsible for condemning it to oblivion.”

The Shape of Water, by Guillermo del Toro, read by Daniel Kraus

The Shape of Water is set in Cold War-era Baltimore at the Occam Aerospace Research Center, which has recently received its most sensitive asset ever: an amphibious man captured in the Amazon. What unfolds is a stirring romance between the asset and one of the janitors on staff, a mute woman who uses sign language to communicate with the creature.

“Developed from the ground up as a bold two-tiered release — one story interpreted by two artists in the independent mediums of literature and film — The Shape of Water weaves together fantasy, horror, and romance to create a tale that is equally gripping on the big screen, and as an audio performance.”

Stay Close, by Harlan Coben, read by Nick Landrum

“Megan is a suburban mum who once walked on the wild side. Now she’s got two kids, a husband, and a growing sense of dissatisfaction. Ray used to be a talented photographer, but at forty he finds himself in a dead-end job. Jack is a detective who can’t let go of a cold case from seventeen years ago.

“Three people living lives they never wanted, hiding secrets that no one would never suspect, will find that the past doesn’t recede…”

Sophie Green

Sophie Green

I work for the Suffolk Libraries stock team. I also write children’s fiction, short stories and comedy. Visit my website.