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Top 10 comedy eAudiobooks

by Sophie Green

As we get closer to Blue Monday (Jan 18), said to be the saddest day of the year, we've compiled our top ten picks to get you laughing this January.

  1. Jo Lycett's Obsessions by Joe Lycett

Hear Katherine Ryan share her love of the Kardashians, Greg James introduce Joe to the world of cricket, and Janice Connolly share her collection of de-cluttering books. Can Lloyd Griffith inspire you with his adoration of fire engines? Or will June Sarpong get you into hula hooping?

Guests include comedian Katherine Ryan, Radio 1 DJ Greg James, comedian Janice Connolly, broadcasting legend Nick Owen, comedian Angela Barnes, author and performer Adam Kay, comedian Lloyd Griffith and broadcaster June Sarpong.

Joe also welcomes members of the public to share their secret passions, as well as inviting a weekly VOP (very obsessed person) to introduce their weird and wonderful collections of curiosities (not for the faint-hearted)!

  1. Ayoade on Top by Richard Ayoade

In Ayoade on Top, Richard Ayoade, perhaps one of the most 'insubstantial' people of our age, takes us on a journey from Peckham to Paris by way of Nevada and other places we don't care about. It's a journey deep within, in a way that's respectful and non-invasive; a journey for which we will all pay a heavy price, even if you've waited for the smaller paperback edition.

Ayoade argues for the canonisation of this brutal masterpiece, a film that celebrates capitalism in all its victimless glory; one we might imagine Donald Trump himself half-watching on his private jet's gold-plated flat screen while his other puffy eye scans the cabin for fresh, young prey.

  1. Straight Outta Crawley by Romesh Ranganathan

At the age of 9, Romesh Ranganathan delivered his first ever stand-up set at a Pontin's Holiday Camp talent competition, smashing the only other competitor, a young girl playing the kazoo.

The gig went so well that Romesh retired his comic genius for twenty two years, hiding behind the guise of a maths teacher, before finally revealing himself again (no, not like that) at the tender age of 31. In 2010, Ranganathan staged his epic comeback gig to an almost silent room, and has since gone on to earn his place as the most in-demand overweight vegan Sri Lankan comedian in Britain.

Now, for the first time, he tells the full story of how he got here. From the delights of Sri Lankan hospitality to the race riots of Crawley and the horrors of vegan cheese, this is Ranganathan's hilarious autobiography.

  1. Son of a Silverback by Russell Kane

The Silverback is considered the undisputed king, a creature whose authority is never challenged and who does not yield to compromise. He walks proudly, feeds greedily, grafts tirelessly, mates voraciously, swears constantly and is threatened all too easily. The Silverback is known to nestle in the misty peaks of central Africa but can also be found in Barking, Essex. Meet Dave Kane, the disappointed, steroid-ingesting, metal-wielding, bouncer father of slight, effete Gamma Male, Russell Kane.

  1. Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse by David Mitchell

These and many other questions trouble David Mitchell. Join him on a tour of the absurdities of modern life - from Ryanair to Richard III, Downton Abbey to phone etiquette, UKIP to hot dogs made of cats. Funny, provocative and shot through with refreshing amounts of common sense, Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse celebrates and commiserates on the state of things in our not entirely glorious modern world.

  1. Late Night Poetry Programme by Tim Key

Tim Key is never far from stage and screen - from Peep Show to Alpha Papa to Taskmaster. But now he's back doing what he does best - attempting to recite poetry whilst tormenting his friend and musician, the equally brilliant, and long suffering, Tom Basden.

From ruminating on the meaning of family via his narrative poem The Godfather, attempting to get to the bottom of death via his poem The Boy Who Faked His Own Death, and also organising an impromptu stag party, Tim Key uses poetry to help him understand every situation.

  1. Dishonesty is the Second-Best policy by David Mitchell

But if you're determined to give it a go, you might enjoy this eclectic collection (or eclection) of David Mitchell's attempts to make light of all that darkness. Scampi, politics, the Olympics, terrorism, exercise, rude street names, inheritance tax, salad cream, proportional representation and farts are all touched upon by Mitchell's unremitting laser of chit-chat, as he negotiates a path between the commercialisation of Christmas and the true spirit of Halloween.

Listen to this book and slightly change your life!

  1. Ramble Book by Adam Buxton

Ramble Book is a very funny and at times incredibly poignant memoir; taking in Adam’s burgeoning love of pop culture as a teenager, his feelings about childhood and parenthood, coming to terms with the death of his father and lots more besides.

  1. The Comic Genius of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore

Peter Cook and Dudley Moore set standards that will probably never be surpassed. Many of these classic recordings were from the Not Only But Also shows.

You can find some of the funniest and most famous sketches of all time, including the wonderful One Leg Too Few—plus, Art Gallery, Lengths, Six Of The Best, The Music Teacher, Bo Dudley, The Psychiatrist, The Frog and The Peach and A Bit of a Chat. 22 tracks in all.

  1. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Meet Don.

Don is a genetics professor who just might be somewhere on the autistic spectrum. He looks a little like Gregory Peck and is getting married. He just doesn't know who to yet.

But he has designed a very detailed questionnaire to help him find the perfect woman.

And it's definitely not Rosie. Absolutely, completely, definitely not.

Rosie, meanwhile, isn't looking for love; she's looking for her biological father. Sometimes, though, you don't find love: love finds you...

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